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Parent upset teacher not fired for attacking evolution, comparing public schools to Nazi death camps

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A parent in North Carolina is upset that a high school biology teacher who compared public education to Nazi death camps and attacked the theory of evolution will be allowed to continue teaching.

Krista Bennett, a parent of a senior at Fuquay-Varina High School, told the News & Observer that she’s disappointed with the Wake County Public School System’s decision not to fire Ray Fournier over an article he published in a home-schooling magazine.

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In the article, Fournier wrote that the public school system was like “a concentration camp dedicated to the spiritual death of those imprisoned behind these walls.” The biology teacher also complained about the teaching of evolution, claiming it discredited “the reliability of the Bible” and got “rid of God as Creator,” and he said public education could turn straight kids into gay kids.

The district announced Friday that Fournier would be suspended for five days without pay.

“The Wake County Public School System recognizes and respects the First Amendment rights of its employees to free speech in their private lives to the extent the exercise of these rights is not disruptive to students, staff, or the school environment,” a spokesman for the school system said in a statement.

“In reviewing concerns regarding statements made by (Fournier), Mr. Fournier acknowledges that he exceeded his rights by making disruptive statements in materials he wrote and published, and has issued an apology for those statements.”

Bennett told the News & Observer that it appears parents’ concerns about the teacher had little influence. She said his punishment was just a slap on the wrist.

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“In the corporate sector you’d get fired over that,” she said. “But I guess not in the school board sector.”

But an education expert with the conservative John Locke Foundation told the News & Observer that the district had made the right decision by not firing Fournier.

“He keeps his job, and the school board avoids a lawsuit they would probably lose,” Terry Stoops said. “And everyone gets to move on and call it a learning experience.”

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This billionaire Republican governor has been sued dozens of times for millions in unpaid bills

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Raymond Dye had a buildup of blood behind his left eye that prevented him from seeing. David Polk had an abnormal heartbeat, and his wife had high cholesterol. Roger Wriston’s wife had a bad back.

All the men had worked for a collection of coal companies owned by Gov. Jim Justice and his family, which had pledged to provide health insurance after the miners retired. Last year, though, the retirees learned that those firms had stopped paying their premiums. And as a result, their coverage had been terminated. Polk skipped doctor appointments.

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2020 Election

‘Recipe for disaster’: NC doctor slams Trump’s hopes for a packed GOP convention as ‘an incredibly bad idea’

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A North Carolina strongly cautioned his state's governor from caving in to President Donald Trump's wishes for a packed Republican National Convention.

The president has threatened to move the RNC this summer from Charlotte if Gov. Roy Cooper did not ease coronavirus restrictions to allow for a full-scale event, but a local physician told WCNC-TV that Trump's plan was unreasonable.

"What do we know about infections?" said Dr. Jeffrey Galvin, of the Vitality Medical Wellness group. "Infection requires two things, exposure plus time."

Trump wants to pack 20,000 Republicans, journalists and others into Spectrum Center in August, but Galvin said infected people shed small amounts of the virus every time they breathe.

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Trump Tower’s profits magically grew by $3 million in 2010 — which helped them borrow another $73 million

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A decade ago, loan filings showed Trump Tower in New York City had a reported profit of about $13.3 million. But when the tower refinanced its debt soon after, the profits for the same year — 2010 — somehow appeared higher. A new lender listed the profits as $16.1 million, or 21% more than they had been recorded previously.

The next year’s earnings for the building also “improved” between the two filings. Profits for 2011 were listed as 12% higher under the new loan than the old, according to reports by loan servicers and data provider Trepp.

ProPublica uncovered the Trump Tower discrepancies by examining publicly available data for mortgages that are packaged into securities known as commercial mortgage-backed securities, comparing the same years in reports for different CMBS. If a bank had held onto the loan, instead of selling it to investors, such information would have been kept private. No evidence has emerged that the Trump Organization was involved in changing the profit figures.

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