Quantcast
Connect with us

It’s almost Thanksgiving, so Walmart is asking employees to donate food to co-workers

Published

on

Walmart is once again asking employees to donate canned goods to help their less-fortunate coworkers celebrate Thanksgiving.

An employee shared a photo Thursday afternoon of a donation bin set up at an Oklahoma store on the Making Change at Walmart Facebook page.

“Rather than agree to pay a decent wage or provide full-time hours, Walmart and its owners (the Waltons) continue to earn massive profits while too many of the workers who make the company a success go hungry,” said the caption to the posted photo.

ADVERTISEMENT

A worker at an Indiana store told Making Change at Walmart that managers at her location were organizing bake sales and encouraging employees to donate food to their co-workers.

“We are all in need, but we feel a sort of obligation to take care of our co-workers who are also struggling,” said Tanya Roudebush, who works for Walmart in Frankfort, Indiana. “The cycle is crazy. It doesn’t make any sense.”

The retailer was widely criticized for setting up donation bins last year at an Ohio Walmart, but a company spokesperson said the food drive was proof its employees cared about one another.

The Making Change at Walmart group, which is made up of employees and community activists, is bringing food Thursday to workers who are striking in Ohio to protest low wages.

“My co-workers and I don’t want food bins,” said La’Randa Jackson, who works for Walmart in Cincinnati. “We want Walmart and the Waltons to improve pay and hours so that we can buy our own groceries.”

ADVERTISEMENT

A report by Americans for Tax Fairness estimated that taxpayers spend $6.2 billion a year subsidizing low wages for Walmart employees through federal assistance programs.

However, nearly 20 percent of all food stamp revenue – about $13.5 billion a year — is spent by shoppers at Walmart.

ADVERTISEMENT

Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Critics of sweeping policy changes always make one huge mistake: Robert Reich

Published

on

In last Wednesday night’s Democratic debate, former South Bend mayor Pete Buttigieg charged that Senator Bernie Sanders’ policy proposals would cost $50 trillion. Holy Indiana.

Larry Summers, formerly chief White House economic advisor for Barack Obama, puts the price tag at $60 trillion. “We are in a kind of new era of radical proposal,” he told CNN.

Continue Reading

2020 Election

Bernie Sanders campaign accepts apology from MSNBC anchor Chris Matthews: ‘We got to get past it’

Published

on

MSNBC anchor Chris Matthews on Monday apologized to the Bernie Sanders campaign after comparing his dominance in the first three states of the 2020 presidential nomination to the fall of France to the Nazis in World War II.

Sanders senior advisor Chuck Rocha was asked on Fox News for response.

"Look, we all get hot and say things in the moment, I'm glad Chris apologized," Rocha said. "We got to move on and get past it, I'm glad he said what he had to say, I'm tired of folks on Twitter fighting with each other, it's time to win this election."

https://twitter.com/Acyn/status/1232099452531331072

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

‘Breathtaking fiscal hypocrisy’ of the GOP may win Trump reelection: Nobel economist

Published

on

Donald Trump was blasted for his economic policies by Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman -- who worries it just might work to get the president reelected.

"It may have slipped by you, but last week Donald Trump suggested that he may be about to give U.S. farmers — who have yet to see any benefits from his much-touted trade deal with China — another round of government aid," Krugman wrote in The New York Times. "This would be on top of the billions in farm aid that Trump has already delivered, costing taxpayers several times as much as Barack Obama’s auto bailout — a bailout Republicans fiercely denounced as 'welfare' and 'crony capitalism' at the time."

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image