Quantcast
Connect with us

Republican governors tell Congress: Don’t shut government down over immigration

Published

on

Republican governors huddling in Florida on Wednesday warned fellow conservatives in Washington against shutting down the U.S. government in response to President Barack Obama’s expected move to ease immigration policy.

Obama’s plan to grant deportation relief for up to 5 million undocumented immigrants was the talk of the Republican Governors Association conference, where 25 governors gathered to celebrate sweeping victories in the midterm elections and plot a path forward.

ADVERTISEMENT

“No! No! They’re not going to shut the government down,” Ohio governor John Kasich told Reuters.

“It’s not even an issue. It’s not going to happen,” said the former congressman, who is often mentioned as a potential presidential candidate in 2016 after a big re-election win.

Kasich and several other Republican governors who may be considering a presidential run said they were wary of a strategy pushed by some conservatives on Capitol Hill who want to use a must-pass bill to fund the government as leverage to fight Obama on the immigration plan.

Such a measure could set up a battle like the one that led to the 16-day government shutdown in October 2013.

ADVERTISEMENT

While Republican leaders have said they do not intend to get into such a fight, the governors in Florida still spoke out against that prospect.

“All this hysteria about a shutdown to me is just people looking to make news,” said New Jersey’s Chris Christie, who also spoke to incoming Republican lawmakers in Washington on Monday.

“I think this Republican Congress and this new leadership will do what they need to do to make sure the government runs and operates and continues to go,” he added.

ADVERTISEMENT

Wisconsin’s Scott Walker, also seen as a White House aspirant, echoed conservative calls for a possible lawsuit against Obama, but he stopped short of calling for a shutdown fight.

“I wouldn’t push a shutdown,” said Walker, who this month won his third election in the swing-state of Wisconsin. “I think you go to court.”

Kasich, who spent 18 years in the U.S. House of Representatives and unsuccessfully ran for president in 2000, said if he were still in Washington he would urge congressional leaders to be in contact with Obama soon.

ADVERTISEMENT

“What I would be saying to the leaders is: ‘Go down to the White House one more time and see if you can get him to put this off until we can write something together.'”

(Reporting by Gabriel Debenedetti; editing by Gunna Dickson)


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

South Carolina woman who told cops they can’t arrest a ‘white, clean girl’ pleaded guilty to DUI: report

Published

on

Last year, 34-year-old Lauren Cutshaw of South Carolina was arrested in Bluffton after running a four-way stop sign at 60 miles an hour. Her blood alcohol level was registered at 0.18 — more than double the legal limit — and she admitted to being high and had marijuana paraphernalia in her car.

According to police reports at the time, Cutshaw offered an unusual defense of her behavior to the arresting officer: she shouldn't go to jail because she's a "thoroughbred ... white, clean girl" who was a cheerleader and sorority sister who graduated with "perfect grades" from a "high accredited university."

Continue Reading

Facebook

Trump’s old business patterns are now spreading across the federal government: report

Published

on

The Trump, Inc. podcast by ProPublica and WNYC is back. And we’ll be bringing you new episodes every two weeks.

When we started all the way back in early 2018, we laid out how we’d be digging into the mysteries around President Donald Trump’s business. After all, by keeping ownership of that business, Trump has had dueling interests: the country and his pocketbook.

We’ve done dozens of episodes over the past 18 months, detailing how predatory lenders are paying the president, how Trump has profited from his own inauguration and how Trump’s friends have sought to use their accessin pursuit of profit.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Republicans are getting nervous about Trump’s chances in Wisconsin: ‘There’s no way he’s gaining supporters’

Published

on

President Donald Trump's election chances, once again, will likely hinge on Wisconsin's suburbs -- but he can't expect a "free ride."

Hillary Clinton infamously lost the crucial state after failing to campaign there in the waning days before the 2016 election, but some GOP voters there are souring on the president, reported Politico.

“For the president to win Wisconsin again, he’s not going to have the free ride he had last time,” said Brandon Scholz, former executive director of the Wisconsin Republican Party. "He’s not going to have Hillary Clinton sitting on her hands “He’s going to have a completely engaged opposition party on the ground.”

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image