California's first 'revenge porn' conviction sends man to jail for topless photos of his ex
A public (not private) Facebook photo of Noe Iniguez

Monday was a historic and wonderful day for humanity (except for those people who post naked photos of their exes to try to get them fired, though I'm not sure how much they fit into the humanity category anyway, in which case ignore this whole disclaimer.)


California made its first ever conviction under a 2013 law against "revenge porn." So, what is revenge porn, criminally speaking? As attorneys at Jackson & Wilson explain,

To prove this crime, the criminal prosecutor must show that the defendant (1) took pictures or videos of another person’s intimate body parts, with the mutual understanding that such images will be kept confidential; (2) distributes such images, where the victim is identifiable; (3) has the intent to cause serious emotional distress to the victim; and (4) the victim actually suffers such distress.

In December 2013, Noe Iniguez, of Los Angeles, set up an alias and posted deragotory comments on the Facebook page of his ex's employer. In March, posted nude photos of her, called her, called her a drunk and a slut and encouraged her employers to fire her, all on the same employer Facebook page.

In addition to violating the revenge porn law,  Iniguez violated two restraining orders which his ex took out against him in November 2011 when he started sending her harassing texts after the end of their 4 year relationship. So, while the revenge porn law is punishable with six months jail time and fines, Iniguez was sentenced to one year and was required to serve 36 months' probation, attend domestic violence counseling and stay away from his ex.

California Attorney General Kamala D. Harris announced in February that an Oklahoma man who allegedly blackmailed women by posting nude photographs of them on his website will face charges under the same law. Can't wait!.