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Jeb Bush to Republicans: Don’t just oppose Obama — lead like adults

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Republicans need to take advantage of their majority in the U.S. Congress to pass bills rather than simply opposing Democratic President Barack Obama’s priorities, potential presidential candidate Jeb Bush said on Monday.

Republicans last month trounced Democrats to win control of the Senate and extend their majority in the House, as exit polls showed Americans were fed up with partisan gridlock in Washington.

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“Republicans need to show they’re not just against things, that they’re for a bunch of things,” said Bush, 61, a former two-term governor of Florida who is considering entering the Republican presidential nomination race for 2016.

“We have to show that we can, in an adult-like way, lead,” he said at a Wall Street Journal conference, pointing to issues such as the Keystone XL oil pipeline and a possible lifting of the ban on crude oil exports.

Bush spoke as some Republicans are weighing shutting down the government in an attempt to stop Obama from taking executive action on immigration policy. Obama last month decided to unilaterally ease the threat of deportation for some 4.7 million undocumented immigrants.

Bush said Obama overstepped the bounds of his authority but that Republicans should focus less on what the president does and more on building consensus in Congress for their own proposals.

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He urged an immigration system that accepts newcomers based on the United States’ economic needs, rather than on the familial ties of those already in the United States — similar to the approach used in Canada.

“It’s also probably the easiest way to get to sustained economic growth, which is what we desperately need,” he said of his immigration approach.

Bush said he would decide in “short order” whether he would run for president in 2016, adding he was still weighing whether the sacrifice his family would have to make would be worth it.

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“It’s the same decision-making process that I’ve always had, which is … do I have the skills to do it in a way that tries to lift people’s spirits, and not get sucked into the vortex,” he said.

(Reporting by Anna Yukhananov; Editing by Ken Wills)


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Mitt Romney used his secret Twitter account to like a tweet about removing Trump from office via the 25th Amendment: report

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During the Ukraine scandal, Republican Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah hasn’t been shy about criticizing President Donald Trump for trying to pressure Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky into investigating former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden. Romney hasn’t actually said that he would vote “guilty” if the U.S. House of Representatives does issue articles of impeachment against Trump and sends the trial to the U.S. Senate, but according to a report by Slate’s Ashley Feinberg, the former Massachusetts governor and 2012 GOP presidential nominee liked a tweet that flirted with the idea of removing Trump from office via the 25th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

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Trump Organization boasts about India towers just days after Eric Trump says family doesn’t do international business

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The Trump Organization undermined Eric Trump's lie about the president's family ending its international business dealings.

President Donald Trump's second son falsely claimed last week to Fox News host Laura Ingraham that he and his siblings "got out of all international business" after their father took office.

"The difference between us and Hunter (Biden) is, when my father became commander in chief of this country, we got out of all international business," Eric Trump said.

However, the Trump Organization run by Eric Trump and his older brother Donald Trump Jr. sent out a tweet Monday morning promoting the Trump Towers in Pune, India.

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Trump struggles to regain his footing after a week from hell leaves the White House in turmoil

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Donald Trump has had some bad weeks in office, but rarely has the US president seen one as difficult as the week ending Sunday, with members of both parties as well as US diplomats rebelling over his Syria and Ukraine policies, while a public uproar forced him to beat a late-night retreat over his choice of a Trump golf resort to host next year's G7 meeting.

The week began with Trump's stunning announcement -- over Twitter -- that he was pulling American troops out of Syria and abandoning their Kurdish allies as Turkey prepared for what seemed sure to be a bloody invasion. The blast of criticism from Republican lawmakers had no precedent during Trump's time in office.

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