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Michele Bachmann takes credit on Twitter for America’s low gas prices

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Outgoing Minnesota Congresswoman Michele Bachmann (R) took to social media late this week to congratulate herself for bringing the price of gas down under two dollars per gallon.

The erstwhile 2012 presidential contender posted a photo of herself standing under a gasoline station’s pricing sign on Friday via the social medium Twitter. She captioned the image “$2 gas, anyone?”

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Bachmann was referring to a campaign promise from her failed run at the presidency in which she vowed to bring gas prices back down under two dollars per gallon.

“Under President Bachmann you will see gasoline come down below $2 a gallon again,” Bachmann said at a South Carolina rally in 2012. “That will happen.”

Now, gas prices have tumbled, which Bachmann is more than happy to take credit for, in spite of the fact that she lost her bid for the GOP nomination in 2012, let alone the presidency.

A column at “birther” hub and far-right conspiracy theory website World Net Daily claimed Friday that Bachmann is getting the “last laugh at her critics.”

“Back in December, Mark Finkelstein of Newsbusters also noticed that gas prices were edging closer and closer to the $2 mark and recalled the mainstream media, or MSM, mockery of Bachmann,” wrote WND’s Drew Zahn.

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Conservative writer Mollie Hemingway tweeted:

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However, energy analysts say that the real reason gas is cheap in the U.S. right now is largely due to a simple increase in supply and decrease in demand. In response to the flood of shale oil from U.S. and Canadian tar sands operations, Middle Eastern oil nations like Saudi Arabia have glutted the market with cheap oil in order to offset their losses as oil prices fall.

Furthermore, due to increase in sales of hybrid vehicles and increasing unpopularity of gas-guzzling SUVs, Americans are using less gas than ever to drive more miles.

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According to the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute’s Michael Sivak, “The reductions in these rates likely reflect fundamental, non-economic changes in society, such as increased telecommuting, increased use of public transportation, increased urbanization of the population, and changes in the age composition of drivers.”

View Bachmann’s tweet image, embedded below:

Bachmann

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