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Survivors return to Auschwitz 70 years later, warn against growing anti-Semitism

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Seventy years after the liberation of Auschwitz, aging survivors and dignitaries gather at the site synonymous with the Holocaust on Tuesday to honor victims and sound the alarm over a fresh wave of anti-Semitism.

On the eve of the landmark event, which is expected to draw several heads of state, a leading Jewish organization was echoed by German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Hollywood mogul Steven Spielberg in highlighting violence against Jews in modern-day Europe.

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Europe is “close to” a new exodus of Jews, European Jewish Congress chief Moshe Kantor warned at a Holocaust forum in the Czech capital Prague.

“Jihadism is very close to Nazism. One could even say that they are two faces of the same evil,” he added.

Merkel said it was a “disgrace” that Jews in Germany faced insults, threats or violence, as she joined survivors Monday in Berlin observing 70 years since the liberation of Auschwitz by the Soviet Red Army.

Spielberg pointed to what he termed “the growing effort to banish Jews from Europe” amid a rise in anti-Semitism on the continent underscored by the deadly Islamist attack on a Jewish kosher grocery in Paris earlier this month.

Underscoring the trend, France’s main Jewish agency CRIF released figures on Tuesday that showed anti-Semitic acts in the country, home to Europe’s largest Jewish population, doubling in 2014 to 851, compared to 423 the previous year.

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Ahead of Tuesday’s ceremonies, Spielberg — who won an Oscar for the Holocaust drama “Schindler’s List” and who has also videotaped the testimony of 58,000 survivors — met with hundreds of them, mostly in their nineties, in Krakow, southern Poland.

Royals in attendance

Royals from Belgium and The Netherlands are expected to be in attendance, as are more than a dozen presidents and prime ministers from across the globe.

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French President Francois Hollande, German President Joachim Gauck and Ukraine President Petro Poroshenko are to participate, but Russia, the United States and Israel have chosen to send lower-ranking representatives.

The Archbishop of Krakow, Cardinal Stanislaw Dziwisz — a former aide to Saint Pope John Paul II — will be there on behalf of the Holy See.

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Also attending is Celina Biniaz, elegant at 83, who was among the 1,200 Jews who escaped Auschwitz by being placed on Oskar Schindler’s famous list.

As a child she left the death camp to work in a nearby factory run by the German industrialist.

“I so wish they would settle that problem in the Middle East because I so believe that it has a definite impact on what’s happening with anti-Semitism all over Europe,” Biniaz, who came from California for the ceremonies, told AFP.

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“The Muslims have been disenfranchised and their young have no hope for the future, so they are desperate and it sounds glamorous for them to join things like ISIS,” she said, referring to the Islamic State jihadist group that has captured swathes of territory in Syria and Iraq.

‘A bomb would have helped’

For survivor David Wisnia, his return to Auschwitz is bringing on nightmares and flashbacks for the first time.

“It’s a lifetime ago really,” the 88-year-old said.

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“Last night sleeping … here, I had a horrible dream and woke up and looked out the window and sort of thought that I was back in Birkenau in cell block 14 where I started in 1942,” he told journalists ahead of Tuesday’s ceremonies.

Part of Nazi German dictator Adolf Hitler’s genocide plan against European Jews, dubbed the “Final Solution”, Auschwitz-Birkenau operated in the then-occupied southern Polish town of Oswiecim between June 1940 and January 1945.

Of the more than 1.3 million people imprisoned there, some 1.1 million — mainly European Jews — perished, either asphyxiated in the gas chambers or claimed by starvation, exhaustion and disease.

In all, the Nazis killed six million of pre-war Europe’s 11 million Jews.

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Historical records show that by 1942, the Polish resistance was providing Allied powers and Jewish community leaders in the US with the first detailed eyewitness accounts of the Holocaust.

But inexplicably, Washington and London failed to act against the six death camps the Nazis set up in occupied Poland.

“The debate as to why the Allies did not bomb the supply lines to Auschwitz remains unresolved,” survivor Marcel Tuchman told AFP in Krakow Monday.

“Whether it was a sinister reason behind it or whether it was just tactical, in that they didn’t want to divert their air force remains unclear,” the 93-year-old said. “A little bomb in the proper place, it would have really helped.”

Watch this video report posted online by ITN:

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Pelosi smacks down Fox News reporter’s question — and hilariously explains to Trump what ‘exculpatory’ means

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) on Thursday smacked down Fox News reporter Chad Pergram after he insinuated that House Democrats seemed "excited" about the prospect of impeaching President Donald Trump.

During a press conference, Pergram asked Pelosi, "Why would the public not think that the House is dead set on a course to impeach the president when all of this milieu was going on?"

"All this milieu is a seeking of the truth," she replied. "It's called an inquiry."

Pelosi at this point turned to the camera and seemed to address Trump directly.

"And if the president has something that is exculpatory -- Mr. President, that means if you have anything that shows your innocence -- then he should make that known," she said. "And that's part of the inquiry. So far we haven't seen that."

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LIVE COVERAGE: Multiple victims reported in Southern California school shooting

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Police are searching for a shooter who opened fire at southern California high school.

The Santa Clarita Valley sheriff's office tweeted Thursday around 8 a.m. local time that shots had been fired at Saugus High School.

Saugus was placed on lockdown, along with nearby elementary schools.

Multiple victims were reported at the school, although few details were released.

The shooter remains at large.

Students evacuate after shooting at Saugus High School in Santa Clarita, California. https://t.co/D6PjO6Y4F7 pic.twitter.com/YD3iGA7Ol5

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After surprise ruling, firearm-makers may finally decide it’s in their interest to help reduce gun violence

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Mass shootings have become a routine occurrence in America.

Gun-makers have long refused to take responsibility for their role in this epidemic. That may be about to change.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Nov. 12 refused to block a lawsuit filed by the families of the Sandy Hook Elementary mass shooting victims, clearing the way for the litigation to proceed. Remington Arms, which manufactured and sold the semiautomatic rifle used in the attack, had hoped the broad immunity the industry has enjoyed for years would shield it from any liability.

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