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DC middle schoolers protest instructors fired for allegedly teaching too much black history

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Students walked out of a Washington, D.C., charter school on Monday to protest the treatment of three teachers they believe were punished for teaching too much black history.

All three of the social studies teachers at Howard University Middle School of Mathematics and Science resigned last week, and students said the principal confronted them in front of students, parents said.

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The teachers were then escorted out of the building.

“They were all escorted out by police officers because they were trying to teach us things about our African heritage,” said seventh-grader Kameron Gains-Gillens.

Parents and students said the teachers were let go because they taught about black history beyond what was outlined in the curriculum, and they’re demanding answers from Principal Angelicque Blackmon.

Some of the parents met Wednesday with Blackmon, who they said had adopted the curriculum of Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools and had asked teachers not to discuss Kwanzaa and the late Mayor Marion Barry.

“The school administration does not want the social studies teachers to teach African-American history,” said parent Shannon Settle. “We are on the campus of an HBCU [Historically Black Colleges and Universities]. We need to know our culture; the school is 90 percent African-American.”

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Members of the D.C. Council Education Committee said they were examining the claims made by students and parents.

Students met staged a protest outside the middle school, where they presented administrators a list of demands.

They asked for new social studies teachers who would be treated with respect and more communication from Blackmon, who parents and students said was “antisocial” and abrasive.

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Students also asked administrators to show them less negative attention and stop tracking them for the “school to prison pipeline.”

Watch this video report posted online by WJLA-TV:

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Twitter baffled at Trump’s tirade over Roger Stone’s sentencing

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Roger Stone, a longtime confidant of Donald Trump, is facing sentencing this Thursday in a Washington federal court after being convicted in November of lying to Congress and witness tampering. In a Twitter rant this morning, Trump lamented Stone's predicament, saying he's being unfairly targeted while figures like James Comey and Hillary Clinton have escaped justice.

"'They say Roger Stone lied to Congress,'" Trump tweeted while sending a shot at his least favorite network, CNN. "I see, but so did Comey (and he also leaked classified information, for which almost everyone, other than Crooked Hillary Clinton, goes to jail for a long time), and so did Andy McCabe, who also lied to the FBI! FAIRNESS?"

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‘Righteous prosecution’: DOJ lawyers ignore Barr’s new guidelines and recommend jail time for Stone

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Four prosecutors in the Roger Stone case resigned when the Justice Department took over the sentencing of Stone and rewrote their memo.

Now, however, the DOJ is still arguing that Roger Stone belongs in jail.

It's a strange turn as the new prosecutor in the case essentially ignored the change in sentencing memos, despite Judge Amy Berman Jackson grilling him about the change.

https://twitter.com/MMineiro_CNS/status/1230525891815596033

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Legal experts shocked as DOJ lawyers rebel against Bill Barr’s new Roger Stone sentencing guidelines

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The new prosecutors in the Roger Stone case still seem to be ignoring the re-write of the sentencing memo, according to those watching the trial unfold.

Judge Amy Berman Jackson told the courtroom Thursday that she reviewed government sentencing recommendations from both the prosecutors who resigned last week and the supervisor who rewrote the memo.

"I note that the initial memo has not been withdrawn," she said.

"There was nothing in bad faith with the initial prosecution team’s recommendation," said Crabb.

"It’s not about bad faith. It was fully consistent with current DOJ policy, wasn’t that true?" Berman Jackson asked.

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