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Muslim group concerned over rising tide of American ‘Islamophobia’

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A pan-Muslim body condemned Saturday the murders of three Muslim students in the United States by a neighbour who espoused anti-religious views, voicing concerns over what it said was increased “Islamophobia” in the country.

Deah Shaddy Barakat, 23, his wife Yusor Mohammad, 21, and her sister Razan, 19, were shot dead on Tuesday in the North Carolina university town of Chapel Hill.

A 46-year-old neighbour, Craig Stephen Hicks, has been charged with three counts of murder over the killings, which sparked outrage among Muslims worldwide.

Police said they are investigating what may have been a parking dispute gone wrong, but have not ruled out a hate-based crime.

Relatives of the victims say they are convinced they were targeted because of their faith.

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“This gruesome crime has left Muslims worldwide in a state of shock and has raised concerns of the growing feelings of hatred towards Muslims and the increase of acts linked to Islamophobia in the United States,” said Iyad Madani, secretary general of the 57-member Organisation of Islamic cooperation.

In a statement on the official news agency of Saudi Arabia, where the OIC is based, he urged the US government to take measures to protect society there from “negative images, discrimination, and stereotyping that contradict the core values of the American society.”

Madani also called for international cooperation to fight “extremism, violence, and religious intolerance, as well as hate crimes and (acts) that incite them.”

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The Federal Bureau of Investigation has opened an inquiry into the murders.

A Facebook page believed to belong to Hicks showed dozens of anti-religious posts, including one calling himself an “anti-theist,” saying he has a “conscientious objection to religion,” and other memes denouncing Christianity, Mormonism and Islam.

Muslim activists have called for Hicks to be charged with hate crimes.

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“There is a high probability that the shooter targeted the victims because of their religion and national origin,” a statement from the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee has said.

The group said it had recorded a jump in “reported hate rhetoric” recently following the release of Clint Eastwood Iraq War movie “American Sniper,” which has been criticised for its depiction of Iraqis.


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Philippines’ Duterte mulls cutting Iceland ties over UN probe

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte is "seriously considering" cutting his nation's diplomatic ties with Iceland after it spearheaded a UN resolution to probe his deadly drug war, the leader's spokesman said.

Duterte bristles at any Western condemnation of his signature campaign, which has killed thousands and critics say could amount to crimes against humanity.

The comments late Monday from presidential spokesman Salvador Panelo came in response to the UN Human Rights Council last week backing the Iceland-proposed resolution to review the killings.

"(Duterte) is seriously considering cutting diplomatic relations with Iceland," Panelo said in a statement.

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AIDS deaths down a third since 2010: UN

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HIV-related deaths last year fell to around 770,000 -- some 33 percent lower than in 2010 -- the United Nations said Tuesday, but warned that global efforts to eradicate the disease were stalling as funding dries up.

An estimated 37.9 million people now live with HIV -- a record 23.3 million of those have access to some antiretroviral therapy (ART), UNAIDS said in its annual report.

Highlighting the enormous progress made since the height of the AIDS epidemic in the mid-1990s, the report showed that the number people dying from the disease fell from 800,000 in 2017 to 770,000 last year.

The figure was down by more than a third from 2010, when there were 1.2 million AIDS-related deaths.

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Describing ‘future we want to live in’ scores of groups unveil new blueprint for reproductive rights

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"The last two years," says new agenda, "have seen increasingly hostile attacks on reproductive autonomy and rights"

Nearly 80 organizations on Monday unveiled a sweeping policy agenda intended to improve sexual and reproductive healthcare and rights.

"We can do more than fight back—it's time to move forward," women's rights group UltraViolet said in a tweet about the plan.

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