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Oklahoma Republican admits his AP history bill is poorly worded

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An Oklahoma lawmaker said on Thursday a bill that would cut funding for Advanced Placement U.S. history courses on the grounds that they did not portray the country in a positive enough light had been poorly worded and that he will revamp it.

The proposal faced stiff criticism from educators and parents who felt cutting funding would deal a blow to students who take Advanced Placement tests for college credit and harm a school system ranked near the bottom nationally in several categories.

Representative Dan Fisher, a Republican, said the bill, which he had authored, was incredibly ambiguous and that he had not intended to hurt the AP program.

“We’re going to clear it up so folks will know exactly what we’re trying to accomplish and it’s not to hurt AP,” he said. “We’re very supportive of the AP program.”

The bill passed an Oklahoma House committee along party lines this week, with 11 Republicans voting for the measure and 4 Democrats opposed.

A new framework for the course introduced in 2012 has sparked controversy. Cultural conservatives blast the changes they see as questioning American exceptionalism, while supporters say the course offers students a balanced way to analyze how American history has unfolded.

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Last year, the Republican National Committee passed a resolution calling on the College Board, which administers the test, to revise the curriculum. The party said it sees the framework as a “radically revisionist view of American history that emphasizes negative aspects of our nation’s history.”

Educators and citizens rallied to show their displeasure with the bill. A Facebook group, Save Advanced Placement Courses in Oklahoma, garnered more than 3,000 supporters since Monday.

Opponents say the revised guidelines for the history course cast the United States in a harsh light by giving undue emphasis to topics such as slavery and the treatment of Native Americans, while distorting events such as the U.S. involvement in World War Two.

In September, the Texas State Board of Education, which is dominated by Republicans, requested the College Board to rewrite the AP U.S. history curriculum.

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Officials for the College Board said the framework, which has yet to be implemented, has the overwhelming support of AP U.S. History teachers and college-level U.S. history professors.

Nearly 4,000 colleges and universities allow those who meet a certain score on AP tests to be given college credit.

(Writing by Jon Herskovitz; Editing by Mohammad Zargham)

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Maddow slams Trump’s era of government officials ‘saving the country from the commander-in-chief’ with leaks

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Rachel Maddow on Monday worried about the pattern of government officials leaking to the press to stop President Donald Trump from sabotaging United States' interests to help Russia.

The MSNBC anchor broke down the key questions raised by the bombshell New York Times report that officials were keeping secrets from Trump to protect U.S. interests.

Maddow reminded of a June 2017 story by Michael Isikoff.

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Trump angrily demands newspaper reveal unnamed sources behind bombshell report on his Russia policy

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President Donald Trump on Monday evening again lashed out at The New York Times for reporting on his Russia policy.

"The story in The New York Times about the U.S. escalating attacks on Russia’s power grid is fake news, and the failing New York Times knows it," Trump argued in a tweet sent after 10 p.m.

"They should immediately release their sources which, if they exist at all, which I doubt, are phony," he continued.

"Times must be held fully accountable," he demanded.

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1140804748423118848

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Trump seethes and calls Fox ‘fake news’ after seeing a story that made him mad

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Trouble appears to be brewing between President Donald Trump and the cable news station he loves: Fox News.

In a tweet Monday night, the president lashed out at the network over its polling and called it “fake news’ — an epithet he usually reserves for mainstream outlets:

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1140768516288782336?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

Media Matters for America Senior Fellow Matthew Gertz, who has previously noted that Trump appears to record news segments and watch them a few hours later, suggested that the president appeared to be reacting to an earlier segment from Special Report with Bret Baier. The segment showed that, even according to Fox News’ polling, Trump trails every single leading candidate in the Democratic field in head-to-head matchups.

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