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Father says there’s no proof son is ‘Jihadi John’

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The father of “Jihadi John” said in an interview published Wednesday that there was no proof that his son was the Islamic State executioner, adding there were a number of “false rumors” circulating.

“There is nothing that proves what is being circulated in the media, especially through video clips and footage, that the accused is my son Mohammed, who is being referred to as the alleged executioner of Daesh (Islamic State),” Jassem Emwazi told the Kuwaiti newspaper Al-Qabas.

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The daily said it spoke to the father of Kuwait-born Mohammed Emwazi at a secret location in his first media interview following accusations that his son is the jihadist who killed several Western hostages.

“I have a message to the Kuwaiti people that many of the rumours are false,” he told the daily.
“Because I felt that some people have believed it, I have assigned a lawyer to defend me and to prove … that what is being said is untrue,” he said.

It was not clear why he appeared to be retracting statements reported earlier that he and his wife had recognized their son’s voice.

His lawyer Salem al-Hashash said he would from Sunday file lawsuits against those who made accusations against Emwazi senior and his family.

Hashash said his client was interrogated by the interior ministry for three hours and released.
A lawyer had been appointed in Britain to defend family members there, Hashash said.

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Mohammed Emwazi, the alleged executioner, was born in Kuwait to a stateless family of Iraqi origin.

His parents moved to Britain in 1993 after their hopes of obtaining Kuwaiti citizenship were quashed.

Emwazi visited Kuwait several times, the last time between Jan. 18 and April 26, 2010, Al-Qabas said.

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A year later, he was denied entry to Kuwait after his name came up during investigations into attacks in Britain.

Media and experts have identified Emwazi as the Islamic State group militant believed to be responsible for beheading at least five Westerners.

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Alternet 2020

Here are 9 things you absolutely need to know about the 2020 Democratic primary race

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If you’re a political junkie who’s been watching every twist and turn in the Democratic primary race since the day after the 2018 midterm results came–and if those in your social media circle are the same way–you’ve probably grown weary of the drawn-out campaign and wish people would start voting already. But keep in mind that many less engaged voters are just now beginning to tune in. Historically, early-state primary polls have only begun to have predictive value after Thanksgiving. That make sense when you consider that most people don’t pick out their Halloween costumes in May or June.

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Trump in 2014 fantasized about Obama falling apart emotionally if he got impeached: ‘He’d be a mess!’

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President Donald Trump has been angrily obsessing over House impeachment hearings -- just like he imagined former President Barack Obama would do if Republicans impeached him back in 2014.

Media Matters this week dug up an old "Fox & Friends" interview with Trump in which he mused over whether Obama secretly wanted to be impeached to boost his poll numbers, similar to what happened with former President Bill Clinton in the 1990s.

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Lawyers use belief in Trump far-right conspiracy theories for murder suspect’s insanity defense

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In the age of Trump, far-right conspiracy theories have gripped a large section of his base, birthing one of the most convoluted and bizarre rumors to date, namely the QAnon conspiracy theory -- which details a complicated and sometimes nonsensical plot by the "Deep State" against Trump and his supporters.

While most people regurgitate this particular brand of paranoia from behind their keyboards, some have been driven to commit acts of violence after being radicalized online, one example being a 29-year-old North Carolina man whose belief in "Pizza Gate" prompted him to walk into a D.C. pizzeria in 2016 and open fire with an assault weapon, believing he was rescuing children held hostage by a Hillary Clinton-run child sex trafficking ring.

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