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Georgia lawmakers close to allowing limited use of medical marijuana

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Georgia lawmakers are poised to legalize a non-smoking form of medical marijuana for patients with seizure disorders and other conditions under a bill that passed the state Senate on Tuesday.

A version of the bill was previously approved by the state House of Representatives, which is expected to sign off on minor changes made by the Senate.

The Georgia legislation would allow patients with diseases including cancer and multiple sclerosis to use a non-intoxicating oil derived from the marijuana plant, a strain commonly known as “Charlotte’s Web.”

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Patients or their caregivers would first be required to obtain a registration card from the state Department of Public Health. Their physician also must certify that they are being treated for one of the medical conditions covered by the bill.

Georgia would be the 12th U.S. state to have such a program, according to the pro-marijuana organization NORML.

The non-euphoric oil is considered a less expansive approach than seen in another 23 states allowing regular marijuana to be smoked for medicinal purposes.

Still, a similar Georgia bill failed last year on the final day of the legislative session.

A spokesman for state Republican Governor Nathan Deal declined to comment on whether he would sign the legislation.

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(Reporting by David Beasley; Editing by Letitia Stein and Sandra Maler)


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‘Giuliani did all the wrong things’ on 9/11: Investigative reporter Wayne Barrett

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Janine Jackson interviewed the Village Voice’s Wayne Barrett about Rudy Giuliani and 9/11 for the August 17, 2007, episode of CounterSpin; that conversation was rebroadcast for the November 29, 2019, show. This is a lightly edited transcript.

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Teenage boy’s family objects to ProPublica publication of video detailing his death

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The family of a teenage boy whose death ProPublica investigated has objected to the publication of a surveillance video that documented his last hours.

Yesterday, ProPublica published a detailed account of failings and missteps by the U.S. Border Patrol, in whose custody 16-year-old Carlos Gregorio Hernandez Vasquez died. As part of the story, ProPublica published several moments from a lengthy surveillance video in which Carlos struggles on the floor of his cell and then stops moving. The video, which had not been shared with Congress or the public, contradicts the government’s claim that Carlos was discovered as a result of a “welfare check.’’ It shows that his cellmate awoke, saw his motionless body, and summoned Border Patrol agents.

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Mass rally marks six-month anniversary of Hong Kong protest movement

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Hong Kong democracy protesters are hoping for huge crowds later Sunday at a rally they have billed as a "last chance" for the city's pro-Beijing leaders in a major test for the six-month-old movement.

The march comes two weeks after pro-establishment parties got a drubbing in local elections, shattering government claims that a "silent majority" opposed the protests.

But activists say public anger is building once more after chief executive Carrie Lam and Beijing ruled out any further concessions despite the landslide election defeat.

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