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Alaska GOPer’s regressive ‘education tax’ would hit poor with rate 10 times higher than the rich

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Click Bishop, a Republican state senator from Fairbanks, has proposed solving the state’s education funding problems by creating a new tax that could hit low-wage workers a lot harder than rich earners.

According to the Alaska Dispatch News, Bishop filed Senate Bill 97 to create what he calls an “education tax.” Anyone making $10,000 or more annually would be taxed at a rate of $100. The rate goes up to $200 for people who make $50,000 or more annually. And the rate would be capped at $500 for earners who make $500,000 or more annually.

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“That means people who earn $10,000 would be forced to pay a tax representing 1 percent of their annual income, while those who make more than $500,000 would pay no more than 0.1 percent,” the Alaska Dispatch News noted.

To make matters worse, half of the annual taxes would be withheld from workers’ first two paychecks of the year. An employee with an annual salary of $10,000 — or $386 weekly — could get hit with a 15 percent cut in take-home pay for the first two weeks of the year.

Due to fluctuating oil prices and decreased oil production, Alaska legislators have been scrambling this session to make up what’s expected to be a $4 billion budget deficit.

State Rep. Paul Seaton, who was described as a moderate Republican, has gone as far as to introduce a conventional income tax bill that would set the state rate at 15 percent of the federal income tax rate. Bishop, however, was not willing to support anything more than his education tax, which was expected to raise $40 million to $160 million.

“I’m not an income tax guy. More and more states are moving away from the income tax,” Bishop told the News Miner. “We’ve got other things we can do here first and this is about as deep I want to go on a tax right now.”

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Most of the other Republican lawmakers have said that they preferred to cut the state budget before considering additional taxes. And Democrats have called to explore additional taxes on the oil industry.


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WATCH: Saturday Night Live airs Christmas special — that’s just one giant dig at the Electoral College

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NBC's "Saturday Night Live" aired an opening skit that was just one giant attack on the electoral college.

A snowman introduced the segment, saying that we could look in on the holiday table conversation thanks to hacked Nest cams.

The skit featured a house in San Francisco, California, a second in Charleston, South Carolina and a third in Atlanta, Georgia.

Each dinner table debated impeachment, and the differences between President Donald Trump and his predecessor, President Barack Obama.

But then the snowman said that none of their votes matter.

"They'll debate the issues all year long, but then it all comes down to 1,000 people in Wisconsin who won't even think about the election until the morning of," the snowman said. "And that's the magic of the Electoral College."

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Georgia mayor being recalled for racism resigns from office: report

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Hoschton Mayor Theresa Kenerly resigned in a special city council meeting held on Saturday, the Atlanta Journal Constitution reported Saturday.

"The resignation came just days after Councilman Jim Cleveland resigned saying he‘d rather leave office on his own terms than face voters in a recall election next month," the newspaper reported. "Both resignations follow an AJC investigation launched seven months ago into claims that an African American candidate for city administrator was sidetracked by Mayor Theresa Kenerly because of his race."

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Nine 2020 Democrats unite to demand DNC Chair Tom Perez scrap debate rules: report

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The Democratic National Committee is facing a revolt for the party's 2020 presidential candidates for its restrictive debate rules.

"Nine Democratic presidential candidates, including the party's front-runners, are urging the Democratic National Committee to toss out the current polling and fundraising rules used to determine who appears in televised debates and reopen the exchanges to better reflect the historic diversity of the current field. The candidates say the rules exclude diverse candidates in the field from participating," CBS News reported Saturday evening.

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