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Julius Caesar may have suffered mini-strokes that changed his personality in later life: study

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Roman emperor Julius Caesar may have suffered a series of mini-strokes, explaining his dark mood in later life, according to doctors at London’s Imperial College.

Caesar, who lived from 100 to 44 BC, has long been the focus of medical debate, with the common assumption being that he suffered from epilepsy.

But medical experts from the London university have reexamined his symptoms, which included vertigo, dizziness and limb weakness, and concluded that he may have in fact suffered from a cardiovascular complaint.

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“To date, possible cardiovascular explanations have always been ruled out on the grounds that until his death he was supposedly otherwise physically well during both private and stately affairs,” said an excerpt of the study written by Francesco Galassi and Hutan Ashrafian.

“When re-evaluating his symptoms, it can be noted that Caesar suffered falls during his campaigns in Spain and Africa at Cordoba and Thapsus,” it added.

“He reported symptoms of headaches, vertigo and later on mentioned giddiness and insensibility, when he could not stand up as senators honoured him.”

Caesar famously collapsed at the Battle of Thapsus in 46BC and had to be carried to safety.

“All of the symptoms reported in Caesar’s life are compatible with him having multiple mini-strokes,” Galassi told The Guardian newspaper.

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The doctors, who researched ancient works including those by Roman scholar Pliny the Elder, also suggested that damage to the brain caused by the mini-strokes could have led to his changing personality and depression in later life.

Epilepsy was considered a “sacred disease” during the time of Caesar’s reign, possibly influencing the diagnosis of his condition, they argued.

One of history’s great military and political figures, Caesar helped Rome conquer Gaul before triggering a civil war by defying the Senate, where he was assassinated.

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Trump has committed at least 11 disgraceful acts just since April: conservative

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On Saturday, writing for The Washington Post, conservative columnist Max Boot outlined all of the chaos President Donald Trump has caused just in the last three months — arguing that "he has disgraced the nation’s highest office as no previous occupant has come close to doing."

"Think about all that has happened since April 5," wrote Boot. "That was before security forces attacked peaceful protesters in Lafayette Square so that Trump could stage a bizarre photo-op. Before he pushed to send the armed forces into the streets. Before he embraced 'white power' and called Black Lives Matter 'a symbol of hate.' Before he vowed to veto the defense authorization bill to prevent the renaming of military bases named after Confederate generals. Before he used the novel coronavirus as an excuse to shut down immigration and threatened to revoke the visas of college students unable to attend classes in the fall."

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In a column for Bloomberg, longtime political observer Jonathan Bernstein said there is not much more Donald Trump could do as president that would be more impeachable than his commutation of associate Roger Stone's sentence for lying for him -- and that Republicans who are either staying silent or cheering on the president will face the wrath of voters in November.

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Ex-Trump adviser launches attack on Roger Stone’s jury forewoman — then dares her to sue him

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On Saturday's edition of MSNBC's "Weekends," former Trump adviser Sam Nunberg went off on a rant attacking the jury forewoman in Roger Stone's trial, accusing her of being a liar and daring her to sue him.

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"So, Sam, you're just saying that a jury foreman and a judge were lying," said anchor Alex Witt. "Where is the proof on that?"

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