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School board president smacks down principal for telling lesbian student she can’t wear tux to prom

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A school board president in Louisiana has smacked down an arbitrary ruling made by a high school principal who warned an openly gay student that she would not be allowed to wear a tux to her prom, telling her, “Girls wear dresses and boys wear tuxes, and that’s the way it is.”

According to the News Star, Carroll High School senior Claudetteia Love was going to boycott her prom after being informed that she wouldn’t be allowed to attend if she wore a tux.

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In an interview, Love’s mother, Geraldine Jackson, said she spoke with Carroll High Principal Patrick Taylor about the school’s no tux rule for girls.

According to Jackson, Taylor told her that members of the faculty were concerned after hearing about her daughter’s choice of dress for the occasion.

“He said that the faculty that is working the prom told him they weren’t going to work the prom if (girls) were going to wear tuxes,” she said. “That’s his exact words. ‘Girls wear dresses and boys wear tuxes, and that’s the way it is.”

According to Taylor, the decision was based upon the dress code and had nothing to do with Love’s sexuality.

Alerted to the controversy, Monroe City School Board President Rodney McFarland said he has called a meeting with School Superintendent Brent Vidrine to take up Love’s case.

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“As school board president, I don’t agree with Carroll banning her from her prom just because of what she wants to wear — that’s discrimination,” he said. “As far as I know there is no Monroe City School Board policy saying what someone has to wear to attend the prom. You can’t just go making up policies.”

Love, an honors student who will attend Jackson State University next year on a full academic scholarship, expressed her dismay at the controversy, saying that the school had previously held her up as a shining example to the student body.

“There are other girls in lower grades than me, and I want for them when they come up to not to have to feel like they aren’t accepted,” Love said. “I don’t want them to feel like they are less of a person because people don’t accept them. There are people in the world that won’t accept you but they don’t have to be so judgmental and make you feel like you’re less of a person and that you shouldn’t express yourself.”

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James Mattis takes swipe at Trump: We have gone ‘three years without mature leadership’

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On Wednesday, The Atlantic reported that President Donald Trump's former Defense Secretary James Mattis has written a furious condemnation of the president, saying he is incapable of "mature leadership" and accusing him of deliberately trying to turn Americans against one another.

“I have watched this week’s unfolding events, angry and appalled,” wrote Mattis, according to the article. “The words ‘Equal Justice Under Law’ are carved in the pediment of the United States Supreme Court. This is precisely what protesters are rightly demanding. It is a wholesome and unifying demand — one that all of us should be able to get behind. We must not be distracted by a small number of lawbreakers. The protests are defined by tens of thousands of people of conscience who are insisting that we live up to our values — our values as people and our values as a nation ... We must reject and hold accountable those in office who would make a mockery of our Constitution.”

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Internet reacts as Obama breaks silence on George Floyd: ‘Great to hear from a real president’

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On Wednesday, former President Barack Obama gave an address on the killing of George Floyd and the nationwide protests against police brutality — giving words of encouragement to peaceful demonstrators and calling for major structural reform to heal the divisions between police and the communities they serve.

Barack Obama: "As tragic as these past few weeks have been, as difficult and scary and uncertain as they've been, they've also been an incredible opportunity for people to be awakened to some of these underlying trends and they offer an opportunity for us to all work together..." pic.twitter.com/wLBhmRy4aT

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DC cop explains why it was so important for him to kneel with protesters

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Officer Carlton Wilhoit scrolled through social media posts before he went to work on Sunday reading many anti-police statements.

As the Washington Post describes it, he suited up and went to work as protesters continued to surround the White House. He, along with his colleagues, were standing in the middle of 16th Street with a crowd of about 60 protesters implored him, "kneel for us." He said he knew he had to.

https://twitter.com/simonmadowa/status/1267448881169731587

“For me, kneeling was the right thing to do,” the young officer told the Post. “At the end of the day, I’m black first. If I were to lose my job today or tomorrow, or if I were to choose a different career path, one thing that would still remain when I take this uniform off is I’m a black man.”

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