Quantcast
Connect with us

Cleveland cops could be forced to submit to federal monitors after settlement with Justice Dept.

Published

on

Cleveland has reached a settlement with the U.S. Justice Department over what federal authorities said was a pattern of unconstitutional policing and excessive use of force, the New York Times reported on Monday.

The settlement could be announced as early as Tuesday, the newspaper said, citing people briefed on the matter.

The settlement would come days after a judge declared a white Cleveland police officer not guilty in the shooting deaths of an unarmed black man and a woman in 2012. The verdict on Saturday prompted protests that led to at least 71 arrests.

ADVERTISEMENT

The details of the settlement were not immediately clear, the Times said. In similar negotiations in recent years, the Justice Department has insisted that cities allow independent monitors to oversee changes inside police departments.

Settlements are typically backed by court orders and often call for improved training and revised use-of-force policies.

Spokesmen for the Justice Department, the Cleveland police and Mayor Frank Jackson had no immediate response to requests for comment.

The results of a Justice Department investigation released in December found Cleveland police systematically engaged in excessive use of force.

Just days before the report was released, a Cleveland police officer shot and killed Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old boy who was carrying what turned out to be a replica gun that typically fires plastic pellets. The shooting is under investigation.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Justice Department has opened nearly two dozen investigations into police departments during the administration of President Barack Obama.

Federal authorities said this month they would investigate police in Baltimore following the death of Freddie Gray, a black man who died of injuries he suffered while in police custody. Six officers have been indicted in Gray’s death.

(Reporting by Ian Simpson; Editing by Peter Cooney)

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

Rick Wilson: Doug Collins is a ‘screeching histrionic drama queen’ who’s ‘waving’ his ‘junk around’

Published

on

Republican strategist Rick Wilson had a few carefully chosen words for the Ranking Member of the House Judiciary Committee, Rep. Doug Collins, Thursday night after a 13-hour day of impeachment debate that featured repeated outbursts, stonewalling, and theatrics from the Republican Member from Georgia.

"I don't want to say that Doug Collins is a screeching, histrionic drama queen, because that would insult screeching, histrionic drama queens," Wilson said on MSNBC's "The 11th Hour," "but this whole thing is a bad faith effort, performative in every way."

Wilson, author of the book, Everything Trump Touches Dies, was far from done.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump is wallowing in ‘self-pity’ even though McConnell promised to protect him: Morning Joe

Published

on

Appearing on MNBC's "Morning Joe," New York Times reporter Peter Baker said Donald Trump is wallowing in "self-pity" that fluctuates with "combativeness" as he worries about the effect being impeached will have on his legacy.

Speaking with host Joe Scarborough, Baker filled in the blanks from his Times report, saying the president is obsessed with the impeachment hearings and Senate trial still to come.

Asked by host Scarborough about Trump's "humiliation," Baker said, "He can count on the Republican-controlled Senate to hold the trial where he seems almost certain to be acquitted, or at least see the charges dismissed in some fashion."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

WATCH LIVE: House holds historic vote on the impeachment of Donald Trump

Published

on

After a 14-hour House Judiciary Committee Thursday hearing considering the impeachment of Donald Trump, Democrats and Republicans on the committee will reconvene once again Friday morning where they are expected to finally vote on the articles of impeachment before sending them to the House floor for a full vote scheduled for next week.

According to NBC, "In a surprise move, Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler delayed the vote until Friday morning at 10 a.m. after more than 14 hours of debate. There were five votes on Thursday: one to eliminate the first article on abuse of power, a second to strike a reference to former Vice President Joe Biden, a third to note the aid withheld from Ukraine was eventually released, a fourth to strike entire second amendment on obstruction of Congress and a fifth to strike the last lines in each article. All were voted down and along party lines."

Continue Reading