Quantcast
Connect with us

Joe Arpaio asks public to pay legal fees, laments: I have to pay for my own lawyers!

Published

on

Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio is asking supporters to pay for the cost of his ongoing legal battles, the Los Angeles Times reported.

“In some instances I have to personally pay for attorneys to represent me in these cases,” Arpaio said in an email to fans late last week. “I do not have the personal wealth or the wherewithal to keep up with the costly demands of paying for attorneys to defend me.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Arpaio made his appeal a day before filing for the removal of District Judge G. Murray Snow from contempt of court proceedings against him.

The sheriff’s attorneys argued that Snow is incapable of being impartial in the case because of a situation created by Arpaio’s own representation; Arpaio revealed last month that a former attorney hired a private detective to investigate Snow’s wife.

“No reasonable person with knowledge of the facts can deny that Judge Snow is now investigating and presiding over issues involving his own family,” Arpaio’s current lawyer, Mel McDonald, argued.

Phoenix New Times reported that McDonald and his team “rode on the coattails” of conservative activist Larry Klayman in filing for Snow to be removed.

McDonald admitted to reading a motion Klayman filed earlier this month that also called for the judge to be removed from the case because of the investigation against his wife. Klayman’s motion was unsuccessful.

ADVERTISEMENT

Arpaio could be found in civil contempt of court stemming from the 2013 court ruling that found his department was engaging in racial profiling against Latinos. If Snow strikes down McDonald’s motion, the sheriff is due back in court in June.

A former sergeant in his “human smuggling unit” testified last month that Arpaio allowed the practice to continue for more than a year after the decision. The sheriff said at the time that he delegated responsibility for following the order to his attorneys and subordinates.

New Times also reported that Maricopa County has spent more than $44 million to comply with the ruling, on top of paying $14.2 million in legal costs.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Former Trump administration official refers to a renowned Black scholar as ‘some criminal’

Published

on

President Donald Trump's former Attorney General Jeff Sessions referred to renowned Black Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. as "some criminal" in an interview with The New York Times Magazine.

Sessions, one of Trump's earliest supporters who was later fired after years of attacks from the president, is currently attempting to reclaim his old Senate seat in Alabama. Sessions has desperately tried to tout his Trumpist credentials on the campaign trail, even as the president has waged a campaign aimed at sabotaging his primary bid.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Miami-Dade cop relieved of duty after punching irate woman at Florida airport

Published

on

A bad situation turned worse, after a woman missed her flight at Miami International Airport. When police were called, things got even worse.

According to the Miami Herald, body-camera footage, which surfaced Wednesday evening, showed the officer hitting the woman yelling at him.

“You acting like you white when you really Black...what you want to do?” the woman without a mask says.

She then stepped very close to the officer, putting her face against his and that's when he struck her in the face.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Appellate Judge says Mary Trump’s tell-all book can be released

Published

on

Yesterday, a judge paused Mary Trump's tell-all book on President Donald Trump and his family, but Wednesday evening, a New York appellate judge ruled that Simon & Schuster could move forward with releasing the book.

According to the New York Times, Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man will be released in four weeks, on schedule.

"Justice Alan Scheinkman’s ruling, however, put off addressing a central aspect of the bitter spat about the manuscript that has been roiling all month in the Trump family: whether, by writing the book, Ms. Trump violated a confidentiality agreement put in place nearly 20 years ago after a struggle over the will of her grandfather, Fred Trump Sr., Donald Trump’s father," the report said.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image