Quantcast
Connect with us

Playing politics with science: House Republicans vote to restrict research funding

Published

on

US House Republicans voted to place limits on funding for scientific research, including climate change studies, as they passed legislation that more narrowly defines their priorities.

Many in the American scientific community criticized the bill, which passed 217 votes to 205 and sets funding guidelines for the National Science Foundation for fiscal year 2016 beginning October 1.

ADVERTISEMENT

The America Competes Reauthorization Act still has to be reconciled with a Senate version, and the White House has threatened a veto if the measure passes as is.

The bill slightly raises overall scientific funding levels, from $7.3 billion this year to $7.6 billion in 2016.

But scientists expressed concern that Republicans were locking in specific funding amounts to each of the seven directorates of the research foundation.

In previous years the NSF itself determined the allocation of federal grants and funding.

Democrats fumed that the bill automatically slashes social, behavioral and economic sciences by 55 percent compared to 2015, while geosciences including climate research shrinks eight percent to $1.2 billion.

ADVERTISEMENT

Research budgets for green energy programs would be hit too.

Conversely, Republican prioritize funding for biology, computer science, engineering, mathematics and physical sciences.

“Unfortunately, NSF has funded a number of projects that do not meet the highest standards of scientific merits,” Republican Lamar Smith, who chairs the House Science, Space and Technology Committee.

ADVERTISEMENT

Many Republicans in Congress openly reject or doubt scientific evidence that climate change is driven by human activity.

The bill prioritizes “basic research and development” and requires that federally-funded scientific projects are “in the national interest.”

ADVERTISEMENT

A coalition of more than 140 researchers, universities, laboratories and other organizations protested against the law, joined by Democrats denouncing what they called the politicization of research.

“Setting authorization levels according to directorate will reduce the flexibility NSF requires to take advantage of unanticipated discoveries and insights, which are coming ever more rapidly in the modern age,” the Coalition for National Science Funding said in a letter to lawmakers.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Here’s why a new rule could result in Trump losing his diploma from Wharton

Published

on

In 2019, a college admissions scandal rocked the country. Thus far it has resulted in 53 people being charged with cheating the system, paying for people to take standardized tests and paying their way into schools. Over the 7-year investigation, the FBI uncovered everyone from celebrities to wealthy families for conspiracy to commit felony mail fraud and honest services mail fraud.

In response to the scandal, the University of Pennsylvania announced that would revoke the degree of any graduate found to have given false information in an admission application, cheated on an exam or tempered with their records, The Daily Pennsylvanian reported.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Gov. Ron DeSantis still won’t reveal true COID-19 data — so things are probably much worse

Published

on

Florida reached 213,000 coronavirus cases on Tuesday, as Gov. Ron DeSantis continues to encourage the state to reopen at all costs.

According to CNN's Randi Kaye, the numbers spell "trouble" for the state as it's GOP leaders are opting for a simplistic approach to reopening.

Just in the last 24 hours, they have had more than 1,600 people hospitalized for COVID," she cited. "In the last two weeks, the hospitalization haves gone up 90 percent. The ICU bed demand has gone up 86 percent, and the ventilator usage has gone up 127 percent. The governor is saying he's sending 100 nurses and 47 beds to Jackson Health because they need it so much. But at last check, we've noted that about 56 hospitals around the state have run out of ICU beds, which means they have no space for anyone who needs an ICU bed. This is really critical for Miami-Dade because they make up the 24 percent of the cases throughout the state, so they really need those hospital beds."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Joe Shapiro — the man who took Trump’s SATs for him

Published

on

The University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School is being thrust into the spotlight after it was alleged that President Donald Trump was admitted after his sister did his homework for him and a friend named Joe Shapiro took his SATs.

In a new tell-all book by the president's niece, Mary Trump, it was revealed that the Penn grad wasn't quite the "genius" he has claimed to be. He announced he was "first in his class at Wharton," though he never was admitted to the prestigious MBA program at the school and he was never listed on the dean's list the year he graduated, the Penn student newspaper reported in 2017.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image