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‘Amateur hour is over’: Ohio Gov. Kasich rips 2016 GOP nomination clown car before climbing aboard

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Looking at if he is about to toss his hat into the already-crowded ring for the 2016 GOP presidential nomination, Ohio Gov. John Kasich took a shot at the existing field, saying , “Amateur hour is over.”

In an interview with CBN host David Brody, Kasich summed up the current field of GOP candidates as lacking in experience and results.

Presumably taking jabs at resume-thin frontrunners like Senators Rand Paul, Marco Rubio, and Ted Cruz, Kasich listed off his accomplishments.

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“It’s experience and record. Amateur hour is over,” Kasich explained. “I was chairman of the Budget Committee when we balanced the budget and cut taxes and paid down debt, when I was in Congress and the economy was roaring. I was a military reformer. I served on defense for eighteen years. I’ve got ten years of private sector experience and I’m running a big state. ”

In a conversation with the Columbus Dispatch, Kasich made it clear he was talking about the his Republican rivals, saying, “Why would I worry about the rest of the field? Look at the resumes and tell me who has national-security experience, who was involved in changing and balancing the budget and getting welfare reform through?”

Unlike many candidates, Kasich has not found it necessary to pander to the party’s extreme right wing base, going so far as to approve  Obamacare’s expansion of Medicaid to low-income adults in his industrial state.

While candidates including former Texas Gov. Rick Perry and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, stumbled and pleaded ignorance about the motives of Charleston church shooter Dylann Roof, Kasich was more direct saying, “You read what they said about the guy. It sure appears that way,” when asked if he thought the murders were racially motivated.

Watch the interview below from CBN:

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Elections 2016

Vietnamese women strive to clear war-era mines

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Inching across a field littered with Vietnam war-era bombs, Ngoc leads an all-women demining team clearing unexploded ordnance that has killed tens of thousands of people -- including her uncle.

"He died in an explosion. I was haunted by memories of him," Le Thi Bich Ngoc tells AFP as she oversees the controlled detonation of a cluster bomb found in a sealed-off site in central Quang Tri province.

More than 6.1 million hectares of land in Vietnam remain blanketed by unexploded munitions -- mainly dropped by US bombers -- decades after the war ended in 1975.

At least 40,000 Vietnamese have since died in related accidents. Victims are often farmers who accidentally trigger explosions, people salvaging scrap metal, or children who mistake bomblets for toys.

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Elections 2016

Chief Justice John Roberts issues New Year’s Eve warning to stand up for democracy

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In a progressive welcoming move, Chief Justice John Roberts issued his New Year's Eve annual report urging his fellow federal judges to stand up for democracy.

"In our age, when social media can instantly spread rumor and false information on a grand scale, the public's need to understand our government, and the protections it provides, is ever more vital," he wrote. "We should celebrate our strong and independent judiciary, a key source of national unity and stability."

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Trump’s next 100 days will dictate whether he can be re-elected or not — here’s why

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According to CNN pollster-in-residence Harry Enten, Donald Trump's next 100 days -- which could include an impeachment trial in the Senate -- will hold the key to whether he will remain president in 2020.

As Eten explains in a column for CNN, "His [Trump's] approval rating has been consistently low during his first term. Yet his supporters could always point out that approval ratings before an election year have not historically been correlated with reelection success. But by mid-March of an election year, approval ratings, though, become more predictive. Presidents with low approval ratings in mid-March of an election year tend to lose, while those with strong approval ratings tend to win in blowouts and those with middling approval ratings usually win by small margins."

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