Quantcast
Connect with us

‘I’m not a South Carolinian’: Rick Santorum and Mike Huckabee dodge Confederate flag issue

Published

on

Republican U.S. presidential candidates Mike Huckabee and Rick Santorum, sidestepping a divisive issue reignited by the church massacre in Charleston, refused on Sunday to say whether South Carolina should remove the Confederate flag from its State House grounds.

Huckabee and Santorum, who draw support from their party’s conservative wing, said it is up to the state to decide. They made their comments a day after 2012 Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney called for the flag’s removal, labeling it “a symbol of racial hatred” to many people.

ADVERTISEMENT

“If the state government of South Carolina wishes to address an issue in their state, that’s fine,” Mike Huckabee, a former Arkansas governor, told NBC’s “Meet the Press” program.

“But for those of us running for president, everyone’s being baited with this question as if somehow that has anything to do whatsoever with running for president. And my position is: it most certainly does not.”

Santorum, a former U.S. senator from Pennsylvania, said on ABC’s “This Week” program, “I’m not a South Carolinian.”

“I don’t think the federal government or federal candidates should be making decisions on everything and opining on everything. This is a decision that needs to be made here in South Carolina,” added Santorum.

Santorum was among those who attended a memorial service on Sunday at the Charleston church where nine black people were killed by a gunman authorities have identified as a 21-year-old white man.

ADVERTISEMENT

The flag at issue, a symbol of Southern pride to some but an image of hatred to others, was the emblem of the pro-slavery Confederate states during the American Civil War. State law in South Carolina mandates that it fly on the capitol grounds.

Jeb Bush, a former Florida governor who is also seeking the Republican nomination for the 2016 presidential election, on Saturday said on Twitter his position on the flag issue is clear.

“In Florida, we acted, moving the flag from the state grounds to a museum where it belonged,” Bush said, adding he was confident South Carolina’s leaders “will do the right thing.”

ADVERTISEMENT

On “Meet the Press,” James Clyburn, a black Democratic U.S. congressman from South Carolina, called on state lawmakers to pass legislation to remove the flag.

Tim Scott, a black Republican U.S. senator from South Carolina, declined to offer his opinion. Scott told CBS’s “Face the Nation” that “my voice will be clear, my position will be stated” but not until after the funerals of those killed in Charleston.

ADVERTISEMENT

(Reporting by Will Dunham and Lucia Mutikani; Additional reporting by Yeganeh Torbati and Doina Chiacu; Editing by Frances Kerry)


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

China vows to retaliate for Trump’s Rose Garden press conference — and could impose new sanctions on America

Published

on

US President Donald Trump said Tuesday he was ending preferential trade treatment for Hong Kong and had signed into law an act that authorises sanctions on banks over China's clampdown in the international finance hub.

In a discursive news conference dominated by attacks on his domestic rivals, Trump declared himself to be the toughest president ever on China, a country he is increasingly positioning as his nemesis ahead of November elections.

Trump announced that he had issued an executive order on Hong Kong as he predicted decline for the restless city, on which Beijing recently imposed a tough new security law.

Continue Reading

2020 Election

Trump’s former White House doctor Ronny Jackson wins GOP runoff for Congress in Texas

Published

on

Ronny Jackson, the former White House physician and President Donald Trump's onetime nominee for secretary of veterans affairs, has won his bid for the Republican nomination for a solidly red congressional seat in the Texas Panhandle.

With 100% of polling locations reporting, though some mail-in ballots will still need to be counted, Jackson held a lead of 11 percentage points over Josh Winegarner, a veteran agriculture expert and lobbyist. Jackson and Winegarner were competing for a seat being vacated by U.S. Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Clarendon, who is retiring and held the seat since 1995.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Ivanka Trump’s tweet raises eyebrows: ‘Why is a senior White House official endorsing a food product?’

Published

on

As her big brother was dragging their 14-year-old half brother into the 2020 campaign, senior White House advisor Ivanka Trump was endorsing a line of canned food products.

If it’s Goya, it has to be good. Si es Goya, tiene que ser bueno. pic.twitter.com/9tjVrfmo9z

— Ivanka Trump (@IvankaTrump) July 15, 2020

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image