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L.A. Police Commission determines one officer violated policy in fatal Ezell Ford shooting

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Los Angeles police commissioners on Tuesday issued a mixed ruling in the shooting of unarmed black man by two patrolmen, largely approving of one officer’s actions while finding that the other had violated department policy.

The decision followed a tense administrative hearing into the shooting death of 25-year-old Ezell Ford last Aug. 11. The five commissioners briefly walked out of the hearing after activists began chanting and holding signs.

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One man was arrested in a hallway outside the meeting room for interfering with a police officer, said Commander Andrew Smith, a Los Angeles Police Department spokesman.

Los Angeles police officials have said two officers shot Ford, who has been described by a family lawyer as mentally challenged, after he struggled with one of them and tried to grab the officer’s holstered gun.

Ford’s death came days after the fatal shooting of black teenager Michael Brown by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, and touched off demonstrations outside police headquarters in Los Angeles.

Ford’s family has filed two lawsuits over the incident, which came during a time of heightened national scrutiny of police use of force against minorities and the mentality ill.

During emotional remarks at the meeting, Ford’s mother, Tritobia Ford, asked the commission to find against the officers in the administrative proceeding.

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“I’m asking you, I’m begging you, please. My son would never grab a gun, he wanted to live. That’s all he wanted.

He didn’t deserve to die for it,” she said.

(Reporting by Katherine Davis-Young; Writing by Dan Whitcomb; Editing by Peter Cooney and Sandra Maler)

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‘He doesn’t care about those kids at all’: Anderson Cooper tears into Trump for pressuring schools to reopen

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On CNN Wednesday, Anderson Cooper blasted President Donald Trump's attempts to push schools to reopen without a plan to keep students safe.

"Today the president of the United States did something rare: he expressed a notion that we can all agree on, that kids belong in the classroom," said Cooper. "But then made it quite clear beyond what it means to himself and his re-election, he doesn't actually care about those kids at all. He doesn't care about their health and safety, nor the health of their teachers and parents, and federal guidelines for keeping them safe."

"The president bragged today about getting the CDC to change their guidelines to weaken them, and lo and behold, the CDC, which used to be a world-respected organization, they are going to come up with new guidelines, less difficult ones," said Cooper. "Just think about that. The CDC puts together guidelines based on science to protect kids and teachers, staying six feet apart and masks and having air flow in rooms and washing hands, and because the president thinks it's too difficult, the CDC is going to weaken them."

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New attack featuring Trump’s sexual comments about his daughters spurs #CreepyTrump hashtag trend

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President Donald Trump's comments about women have been bad enough, but when it comes to his comments about his own daughters, it gets even worse.

As a baby, Trump was already thinking about whether his second daughter, Tiffany, would have breasts like her mother. In appearances on "The View" and "The Wendy Williams Show," Trump talked about how he wishes he could date his first daughter Ivanka and that "sex" is something they have in common.

The bizarre statements add to the strange videos of Trump watching young women dance with his friend Jeffrey Epstein. Ultimately, Epstein was arrested after years of sex with underage children.

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2020 Election

‘This spells disaster’: Columnist says GOP is heading for a wipeout in the Senate — and beyond

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On Wednesday, writing for The Washington Post, columnist Henry Olsen said the electoral signs are getting grimmer for the GOP by the day — for their prospects of maintaining control of the Senate, but also of their seats further down the ballot.

"Elections in both the House and Senate are increasingly syncing with broader presidential races," wrote Olsen. "In 2016, every Senate race was won by the same party that won that state in the presidential contest. In 2018, House races largely correlated with Trump’s approval rating, with even the most popular GOP incumbents unable to run more than a few points ahead of the president. Polls for Senate races this year show the same trend, with Republican incumbents’ totals closely matched with Trump’s. This spells disaster for the party."

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