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Son of reviled Westboro Baptist founder mocks family’s church in awesome pro-gay Facebook post

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The son of the founder of the reviled Westboro Baptist Church known for their “God Hates Fags” signs at funerals, took a sarcastic slap at his own family on Facebook, telling them their hateful anti-gay actions pushed, “decent people away from hatred and into the arms of justice and equality.”

Nate Phelps, one of thirteen children fathered by Westboro founder Fred Phelps, left his father’s church in 1980 and has since became a virulent critic of their theology, actions, and rhetoric. Since he was publicly censured by the church he has become an advocate for LGBT causes while residing in Canada where gay marriage has been legal since 2005.

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Following the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling affirming same sex marriage on Friday, Nate Phelps took to his Facebook page to mock both his family and their church, congratulating them for helping to push public opinion towards marriage equality.

“A special thank you to my family of birth for relentlessly and colourfully demonstrating the cruelty of anti-gay sentiment, thus driving decent people away from hatred and into the arms of justice and equality.”

In early June, Phelps wrote a piece for the Huffington Post, saying of gay marriage: “There are no legitimate negative consequences to providing marriage equality to the LGBTQ community. Unless you consider that we will at some point have to confront our conscience for this historical injustice.”

A screenshot of Phelps’ Facebook post can be seen below:

Screen Shot 2015-06-27 at 8.14.22 AM

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Former right-wing presidential candidate scamming Americans with toxic bleach cure

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Former diplomat and Reagan adviser Alan Keyes is a well-known gadfly who has run multiple times for president and for Senate, most famously against future President Barack Obama in 2004.

But lately, according to The Daily Beast, he has been involved in a different pursuit: the promotion of a dangerous pseudoscience scam known as the "Miracle Mineral Solution," or MMS.

The substance, which is actually just the powerful bleach chlorine dioxide, is supposedly a cure for everything from viral infections to infertility, and there was even a cultlike church known as the Genesis II Church of Health and Healing, that promoted it as a gift from God. MMS has particularly taken root in developing countries like Uganda, but it also has a following in the United States, and many autistic children have been forced to drink it. Versions of this scam have even been promoted on Amazon.

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American exceptionalism is killing the planet

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Ever since 2007, when I first started writing for TomDispatch, I’ve been arguing against America’s forever wars, whether in Afghanistan, Iraq, or elsewhere. Unfortunately, it’s no surprise that, despite my more than 60 articles, American blood is still being spilled in war after war across the Greater Middle East and Africa, even as foreign peoples pay a far higher price in lives lost and cities ruined. And I keep asking myself: Why, in this century, is the distinctive feature of America's wars that they never end? Why do our leaders persist in such repetitive folly and the seemingly eternal disasters that go with it?

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Joni Ernst accused of involvement in ‘dark money’ re-election scheme: report

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According to a report from the Associated Press, Sen. Joni Ernst (R-IA) has been accused of illegally working with an outside group to help her re-election prospects in a tough 2020 fight with Donald Trump on the ballot.

According to AP: "An outside group founded by top political aides to Sen. Joni Ernst has worked closely with the Iowa Republican to raise money and boost her reelection prospects, a degree of overlap that potentially violates the law."

"Iowa Values, a political nonprofit that is supposed to be run independently, was co-founded in 2017 by Ernst’s longtime consultant, Jon Kohan. It shares a fundraiser, Claire Holloway Avella, with the Ernst campaign," the report continued. "And a condo owned by a former aide — who was recently hired to lead the group — was used as Iowa Values’ address at a time when he worked for her."

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