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Republican presidential candidates flock to small creationist church in Iowa

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A small Iowa church that teaches the universe is only 6,000 years old is a big draw for Republican presidential candidates.

White House hopefuls Ben Carson and Mike Huckabee have already visited the First Assembly of God Church in Indianola, and Bobby Jindal is scheduled to be at the church Saturday, according to the Des Moines Register.

The church hosted a five-day conference on young Earth creationism called the Indianola Hope Conference last year. Rev. Jordan Cleigh of the First Assembly of God Church told the Des Moines Register at the time that fossils discovered by scientists were evidence of the Great Flood described in Genesis.

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“For the past 50 to 60 years public schools have been teaching evolution even though evolution doesn’t have all of the answers either,” Cleigh told the Register. “(Creationism) lets people believe in the Bible and Jesus.”

The conference featured a debate between Iowa State University professor Hector Avalos and Iglesia Centro Evangelico pastor Juan Valdes on whether the book of Genesis was a scientifically accurate description of the beginning of the world. The event also included a number of talks delivered by Carl Kerby, a self-described “creation scientist” who believes that dinosaurs were on Noah’s Ark.

The three Republican presidential candidates have expressed doubts about evolution.

Carson said last year that scientists couldn’t explain how eyes evolved. “Give me a break. According to their scheme, it had to occur over night, it had to be there,” he told the Faith & Liberty Talk Show. “I instead say, if you have an intelligent creator, what he does is give his creatures the ability to adapt to the environment so he doesn’t have to start over every fifty years creating all over again.”

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Huckabee said during a 2007 presidential debate that he didn’t believe in evolution. “In the beginning, God created the heavens and the Earth. A person either believes that God created the process or believes that it was an accident and that it just happened all on its own,” he said.

When asked if the world was only 6,000-years-old, Huckabee replied, “I don’t know.”

Jindal has supported legislation in Louisiana that allows creationism to be taught in public schools. Last year, he repeatedly refused to say whether he believed the theory of evolution.

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“The reality is, I’m not an evolutionary biologist,” he remarked.


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Swiss holding ‘funeral march’ to mark disappearance of an Alpine glacier

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Dozens of people will undertake a "funeral march" up a steep Swiss mountainside on Sunday to mark the disappearance of an Alpine glacier amid growing global alarm over climate change.

The Pizol "has lost so much substance that from a scientific perspective it is no longer a glacier," Alessandra Degiacomi, of the Swiss Association for Climate Protection, told AFP.

The organisation which helped organise Sunday's march said around 100 people were due to take part in the event, set to take place as the UN gathers youth activists and world leaders in New York to mull the action needed to curb global warming.

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2020 Election

UAW strike ‘threatens to upend the economy in Michigan’ — and could destroy Trump’s re-election: report

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At the end of the first week of a major strike by the United Auto Workers, the employment standoff threatens to upend President Donald Trump's 2020 re-election map, the Chicago Times reported Saturday.

Approximately 46,000 workers have been striking against General Motors.

There are two major threats to Trump's campaign from the strike.

The first is that the strike could cause regional recessions -- threatening Trump's political standing in key Rust Belt states.

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Security forces fired live rounds at protesters calling for the ouster of Egyptian president: report

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Egyptian security forces clashed with hundreds of anti-government protesters in the port city of Suez on Saturday, firing tear gas and live rounds, said several residents who participated in the demonstrations.

A heavy security presence was also maintained in Cairo's Tahrir Square, the epicentre of Egypt's 2011 revolution, after protests in several cities called for the removal of general-turned-president Abdel Fattah al-Sisi.

Such demonstrations are rare after Egypt effectively banned protests under a law passed following the 2013 military ouster of Islamist ex-president Mohamed Morsi.

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