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Alzheimer’s experts say dementia cases will nearly triple by 2050

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The number of people with dementia worldwide will nearly triple from 47 million today to 132 million in 2050, a report said Tuesday.

Dementia is an umbrella term for degenerative diseases of the brain characterised by a gradual decline in the ability to think and remember.

Accounting for well over half of cases, Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia.

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As the world gets older, the number of people with dementia is set to increase exponentially, notes the World Alzheimer Report 2015, produced by Alzheimer’s Disease International.

Today there are 900 million people 60 or older. Over the next 35 years, that age group will grow by 65 percent in rich countries, 185 percent in lower-middle income nations, and 239 percent in poor countries.

In 2015 alone, there will be about 10 million new cases, one every few seconds and nearly 30 percent more than in 2010.

The risk increases dramatically as we age.

Fewer than four out of every 1,000 people aged 60 to 64 are afflicted with some form of what used to be called senility. But from the age of 90, that ratio jumps to 105 for every 1,000 people, more than 10 percent.

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The global cost burden of dementia is likewise increasing sharply, having risen by more than 35 percent over the last five years to $818 billion (709 billion euros) in 2015.

Sixty percent of the cost was for medical and institutional care.

“Population ageing alone drives the projected increases,” said the report.

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Former ‘America First’ Senate candidate arrested for domestic violence for a second time

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A Maine man who was gearing up to challenge Susan Collins (R-ME) for her Senate seat has been charged with domestic violence -- for the second time, CentralMaine.com reports.

On Sunday, 45-year-old Derek Levasseur was arrested and booked at the Fairfield Police Station on a domestic violence assault charge. He was later released on bail.

Levasseur announced his Senate bid earlier this year touting an “America First” platform, making him the first Republican to challenge Collins since she was elected in 1996. He later quit the race, blaming pressure from "party elites." According to the police report, he was involved in a “domestic situation” inside a residence when he was arrested.

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Ex-GOP lawmaker drops the mic on Lindsey Graham: ‘A political opportunist who will flop with the winds’

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Former Rep. David Jolly (R-FL) told Vox.com's Sean Illing this week that he hasn't seen that much change between the Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) that we saw before President Donald Trump's election and the Lindsey Graham we see today.

Over the course of a lengthy interview, Illing asked Jolly how anyone could compare the statements that Graham made about Trump in 2016 with the fierce defenses he's recently been making of the president and not conclude that the South Carolina senator is a blatant fraud.

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With support of just one Republican, House passes ‘historic’ bill to restore and expand voting rights

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Brian Fitzpatrick

"Brings us one step closer to restoring the Voting Rights Act."

Just one Republican—Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania—joined a united House Democratic caucus on Friday to pass what rights groups hailed as "historic" legislation to restore and expand voter protections that were gutted by the Supreme Court in 2013.

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