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Bergdahl lawyers seeks public release of military report on disappearance

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The lawyers for U.S. Army Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl filed papers on Monday seeking the public release of the military report on the soldier who left his post in a remote part of Afghanistan and spent nearly five years imprisoned by the Taliban.

The report on Bergdahl’s disappearance and capture was put together by Major General Kenneth Dahl, who told a military hearing last week at a base in San Antonio that he did not believe the soldier should face jail time for his actions..

Bergdahl’s defense counsel said in its filing: “These documents are unclassified. They were repeatedly referred to in testimony in open court in the presence of spectators.”

The lawyers added Bergdahl had been vilified in the media and among some politicians over the past year, and the release of the military’s official report, which includes 371 pages of testimony from Bergdahl, would help the public better understand what happened.

U.S. military prosecutors said at the end of the two-day hearing that Bergdahl intended to desert his post, his actions fundamentally altered American operations in Afghanistan and that he should be held accountable for his actions.

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The hearing at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio was to gather evidence to reach a decision whether Bergdahl, 29, should be court-martialed on charges brought against him in March of desertion and misbehavior before the enemy.

Bergdahl was held by the Taliban in Afghanistan for five years before being swapped in 2014 for five of the group’s leaders in a move that generated a political firestorm. If convicted of misbehavior, he could be sentenced to life in prison..

Bergdahl did not sympathize with the Taliban and was motivated to act over what he perceived to be problems of leadership so severe that he felt his unit was in danger, the major general who led the investigation said, adding Bergdahl’s views of those around him could be naive and uninformed.

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A massive search was launched for Bergdahl that lasted 45 days. Soldiers were pushed to the limits on the mission that covered vast and difficult terrain.

“My conclusion is that there were no soldiers killed who were deliberately looking for Sergeant Bergdahl,” Dahl said.

Terrence Russell, an expert with the military’s Joint Personnel Recovery Agency, said Bergdahl received some of the worst abuse at the hands of his abductors of any U.S. prisoner of war in the past half century.


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Kim Jong-un threatens to restart nuke tests as Trump’s efforts to talk to the regime fall apart again: report

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On Tuesday, CNN's Brian Todd reported that the North Korean regime is on the brink of rescinding what little they promised President Donald Trump, as the future of his efforts to continue talks appear uncertain.

"Kim Jong-un's regime is once again in negotiation by intimidation," said Todd. "Just two weeks after their historic meeting at the DMZ, and President Trump's short stroll into North Korea, North Korea's dictator Kim Jong-un appears to be threatening to start testing his nuclear weapons again. In a new statement, Kim's foreign ministry calls the joint U.S./South Korean military exercises planned for next month a breach of the main spirit of what President Trump and Kim agreed to in Singapore, and says, 'We are gradually losing our justifications to follow through on the commitments we made with the U.S."

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Republican freaks out after Democrat quotes Trump’s racist statement on the floor of Congress

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Chaos continued on the floor of the House of Representatives during the debate on a resolution condemning President Donald Trump's racist attacks on four young women of color.

Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-CA) rose to support the resolution, listing multiple instances of racism from the commander-in-chief.

As part of the list, Swalwell noted Trump's attacks on "sh*thole countries."

After he swore on the floor by quoting the president, Republicans freaked out.

Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA) complained and got in a back-and-forth with Swalwell.

Collins sought to have Swalwell's words stricken from the Congressional Record, which would have banned him from speaking for the rest of the day.

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Appeals court delivers ‘tremendous blow to federal workers’ with decision to uphold Trump’s anti-union executive orders

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"There must be a check on the president's power to destroy federal employees' union rights."

Unions representing hundreds of thousands of federal employees on Tuesday vowed to fight a federal appeals court ruling in which a three-judge panel unanimously upheld President Donald Trump's executive orders attacking workers' rights.

The U.S. Court of Appeals in the D.C. Circuit said that it lacked jurisdiction to block Trump's orders, which made it easier to fire federal employees, limited the amount of time workers can spend on union business, and compelled federal agencies to devise unfavorable contracts with unions.

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