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Births to undocumented US immigrants down 20 percent from 2007 peak: Pew

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The number of children born in the United States to undocumented immigrants has dropped by about 20 percent since its 2007 peak after rising sharply for a quarter-century, the Pew Research Center said on Friday.

An analysis of Census Bureau data by the polling group showed that about 8 percent of the nearly 4 million births in the United States in 2013 had at least one parent who was living in the country illegally.

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Children of undocumented immigrants became a prominent issue in the race for the White House after U.S. Republican presidential hopeful Jeb Bush used the phrase “anchor babies” in a radio interview last month and was criticized by other presidential candidates for doing so.

Immigration critics sometimes use the term “anchor babies” to describe U.S.-born children of illegal immigrants. Immigration groups say the phrase is offensive.

The 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution grants citizenship to any child born on U.S. soil, regardless of parentage.

About 295,000 babies were born to parents who were unauthorized immigrants in 2013, down from 370,000 in 2007, Pew said.

Some Republicans seeking the presidential nomination, including Donald Trump, have criticized across-the-board birthright citizenship.

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About 11.3 million unauthorized immigrants lived in the U.S. in 2013, making up 4 percent of the population, Pew said. It said their share of total births is higher because the immigrants include a greater share of women in their childbearing years and have higher birthrates than the overall U.S. population.

Most children of unauthorized immigrants in the United States are born here and thus are citizens, Pew said. Unauthorized immigrants are more likely than in the past to live with U.S.-born children and to be long-term U.S. residents, Pew said.

There were 4.5 million U.S.-born children younger than 18 living with parents who were unauthorized immigrants parents in 2012, Pew said.

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AG Bill Barr will ‘try to interfere’ in the 2020 election to re-elect Trump: MSNBC national affairs analyst

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Attorney General William Barr will use the Department of Justice to "try to interfere" in the 2020 presidential election to re-elect Donald Trump, MSNBC's national affairs analyst predicted on Tuesday.

John Heilemann was interviewed by Lawrence O'Donnell on MSNBC's "The Last Word."

"The attorney general, from the moment he walked into this job, has behaved in a -- as a ruthless, relentless political hack and a thug and who has behaved not as attorney general of the United States," Heilemann said.

"He made a travesty of the Mueller report and continues to lie on Donald Trump's behalf at every opportunity," he added.

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Trump welcomed Russia’s Sergey Lavrov to the White House — to humiliate us all

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Despite the fact that President Donald Trump still refuses to have Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to Washington for an officials meeting — a topic at the center of the scandal driving Trump’s impeachment — the White House hosted Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov on Monday.

And while Lavrov was honored with his second private Oval Office meeting (the first one was a cataclysmic disaster) and a press conference with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, the foreign minister took his opportunity here to repeatedly humiliate the United States.

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United States, Mexico, Canada finalize Donald Trump’s USMCA trade deal

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The United States, Mexico and Canada signed a deal Tuesday to finalize their new trade agreement, paving the way to ratification after more than two years of arduous negotiations.

However, the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump in the US Senate would likely delay Congressional ratification of the agreement until next year, said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

In reality, it is the second time the three countries have triumphantly announced the conclusion of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), the deal meant to replace the 25-year-old NAFTA, which President Donald Trump complains has been "a disaster" for the US.

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