CNN host schools Carson campaign on Muslim presidents: 'Let me read to you Article 6 of the Constitution'
Ben Carson speaking at the 2015 Conservative Political Action Conference (Gage Skidmore/Flickr)

CNN host Alisyn Camerota reminded Dr. Ben Carson's business manager on Monday that the GOP candidate's opposition to a Muslim president "violates the Constitution."


According to business manager and conservative radio host Armstrong Williams, Carson was "thinking like someone who loves America" when he said over the weekend that a Muslim should not be president.

"He understands there are tenets of Islam that hates Jews, will kill homosexuals, will kill Muslims, do not advocate the belief and value system that made America into the country it is today," Williams asserted. "It may be an inconvenient truth but it is the truth."

Camerota pointed out that Williams was not describing the beliefs of "millions of American Muslims."

"You know, there are more American Muslims that there are Episcopalians," she noted.

"This is America, it is a place of freedom of speech," Williams insisted.

"And freedom of religion!" Camerota exclaimed.

"This is not an issue of religion to Dr. Carson," Williams replied.

"Let me read to you Article Six of the Constitution," the CNN host pressed, "which says that anyone of any religion can serve in public office: 'No religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States.'"

"Dr. Carson's belief system violates that part of the Constitution," Camerota added.

Williams, however, argued that "most Americans in their hearts" would not accept a Muslim president.

"Dr. Carson, because of his love for America, everything is not about winning the White House for him, it's about standing up for what he believes in, telling the truth, even if it makes CNN and other uncomfortable," he continued. "It is what he believes."

"He believes it, Alysin, and he will not take it back," he concluded.

Watch the video below from CNN's New Day, broadcast Sept. 21, 2015.