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Bernie Sanders announces speech to explain principles of ‘democratic socialism’ to US public

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U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders talks to supporters at a fundraising house party at the home of Gerhild Krapf and Michael Brau in Iowa City, Iowa, October 18, 2015. REUTERS/Scott Morgan

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders said on Sunday he plans to give a major speech soon to explain his belief in democratic socialism, acknowledging the political label could be a stumbling block to winning over American voters.

The U.S. senator from Vermont, who touted his democratic socialist views in last week’s Democratic presidential debate, said many Americans misunderstand socialism and did not recognize it in popular government programs such as Social Security and Medicare.

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“I think there are a lot of people who, when they hear the word ‘socialist,’ get very, very nervous,” Sanders told reporters at a campaign stop in Iowa, the state that on Feb. 1 starts the 2016 Democratic nominating contest leading up to the November 2016 election.

“What we’re probably going to do to begin with is hold a major speech in the not-too-distant future to define exactly what I mean by democratic socialism,” Sanders told a supporter in Iowa City who asked how he would counteract political attacks on his socialist views.

“To me, democratic socialism means democracy. It means creating a government that represents all of us, not just the wealthiest people in the country,” Sanders said.

Sanders has become the leading challenger to front-runner Hillary Clinton in the 2016 Democratic presidential race with calls for greater economic equality, including more taxes on the wealthy and corporations and more government spending on programs such as free college tuition and a higher minimum wage.

But the political label of “socialist,” with its Cold War associations and images of government takeovers of private industry, evokes negative connotations for many Americans and is typically used as a slur against U.S. politicians.

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Sanders said voters just needed to better understand the concept.

“I think we have some explaining and work to do, but I think at the end of the day you are going to find more and more people agreeing with our point of view,” Sanders said.

“You go to your public library, or you call your fire department or police department, what do you think you are calling? These are socialist institutions,” he said.

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Sanders said voters should know that countries like Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Germany had instituted successful socialist economic programs while remaining democratic.

“They may not be familiar with some of the very positive policies that those governments have developed for the middle class and working families,” Sanders said. “So I think that’s a discussion we have to have.”

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(Editing by Jonathan Oatis)


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Trump supporter arrested for child abuse after striking 12-year-old girl with a flagpole: report

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A Florida man was arrested this week after he was caught on video assaulting a 12-year-old girl with a flag pole, the Florida Times-Union reports.

Norbert Eugene Logsdon Jr. was charged Wednesday with abuse of a child without great bodily harm. He was subsequently released in bail.

The incident was captured on video by the child's mother and was posted to Facebook. She and her daughter were driving past a sidewalk pro-Trump demonstration when the mother yelled something antagonistic to the Trump supporters. That's when Logsdon shoved the flagpole through the open right-front passenger window.

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Medical expert doubts Trump’s claim every American will have a COVID vaccine by April: ‘I don’t see how that’s possible’

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Speaking on CNN this Friday, professor of tropical medicine, Dr. Peter Hotez, pushed back on President Trump's claim that every American will have access to a coronavirus vaccine by April.

According to Hotez, there's "just too many unknowns right now" for Trump or any other administration official "to make such a statement.

Even if the vaccines currently in development work, "we don't have the details on the distribution," he added.

"There's going to be a lot of unknown questions," he continued. "We have to really take it in stages."

Watch the video below:

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Shocking emails document Trump administration’s scheme to muzzle the CDC — and misinform Americans

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Emails obtained by The New York Times detail how Trump administration political appointees sought to silence the Centers for Disease Control during the coronavirus pandemic.

"On June 30, as the coronavirus was cresting toward its summer peak, Dr. Paul Alexander, a new science adviser at the Department of Health and Human Services, composed a scathing two-page critique of an interview given by a revered scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention," the newspaper reported. "Dr. Anne Schuchat, a 32-year veteran of the C.D.C. and its principal deputy director, had appealed to Americans to wear masks and warned, 'We have way too much virus across the country.' But Dr. Alexander, a part-time assistant professor of health research methods, appeared sure he understood the coronavirus better."

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