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California trans inmates now able to seek sex-reassignment surgery

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Guidelines to decide whether transgender prison inmates in California can undergo sex reassignment surgery took effect Tuesday, making it the first U.S. state to offer a regular path to such treatment.

California last summer agreed to regularly provide and pay for treatments including hormones as well as surgery to alter the biological sex of its prisoners.

“California has set a model for the rest of the country and ensured transgender people in prison can access life-saving care when they need it,” said Kris Hayashi, executive director of Transgender Law Center, which represents two inmates who sued the state after being denied the surgery.

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Under the new rules, which follow a legal settlement reached in August with one of the inmates, prisoners seeking to change their biological sex would need to be evaluated by medical and mental health professionals, and present their cases to a six-member committee of doctors, psychologists and psychiatrists.

Committee members would vote on whether the surgery was warranted, and a committee chair who is a medical administrator in the prison system would hold a tie-breaking vote.

They would also have to live for a year in their preferred gender roles and undergo hormone therapy.

Under the terms of the settlement with Shiloh Quine, who was born male but identifies as a woman, the state agreed to provide her surgery and transfer her to a women’s prison.

Officials also agreed to allow other male inmates who identify as female to be housed in women’s prisons; female inmates who identify as male would also be allowed to live in men’s prisons if they requested it.

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The state also agreed to allow inmates who are transgender or have gender dysphoria access to clothing, toiletries and other items consistent with their gender identities.

The state had earlier been ordered by a court to pay for sex reassignment surgery for Michelle Norsworthy, another inmate who was born male but identified as female.

Norsworthy, who was released on parole and thus made ineligible for surgery funded by the prison system, also welcomed the new guidelines.

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“I am beyond proud to have been part of the movement to make this policy happen,” Norsworthy said. “I suffered for decades as my identity, my medical needs and my very humanity were denied by the people and the system responsible for my care.”

(Editing by Eric Walsh)

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Rep. Ilhan Omar asks judge to ‘show compassion’ for man who threatened to put bullet in her head

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After a man accused of threatening her life pled guilty to the crime in a U.S. District Court, Rep. Ilhan Omar on Tuesday released publicly a letter she wrote asking the federal judge presiding over the case to "show compassion" in his sentencing.

Patrick W. Carlineo Jr., a 55-year-old man from upstate New York, pled guilty on Monday on gun charges and for threatening to murder Omar in phone calls he made to her congressional office in March of this year. But in her letter to Judge Frank P. Geraci Jr., Omar said that while the charges were quite serious she did not think that an overly punitive sentence was the answer.

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Why saying ‘OK boomer’ at work is considered age discrimination – but millennial put-downs aren’t

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The phrase “OK boomer” has become a catch-all put-down that Generation Zers and young millennials have been using to dismiss retrograde arguments made by baby boomers, the generation of Americans who are currently 55 to 73 years old.

Though it originated online and primarily is fueling memes, Twitter feuds and a flurry of commentary, it has begun migrating to real life. Earlier this month, a New Zealand lawmaker lobbed the insult at an older legislator who had dismissed her argument about climate change.

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Academic experts analyze Johnson and Corbyn’s claims in first 2019 UK election debate

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Boris Johnson, the UK prime minister, and Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the Labour Party, have answered questions from the public in a head-to-head debate as they prepare for the country’s general election on December 12.

A court ruling earlier in the day upheld ITV’s decision not to offer podiums to either the SNP or the Liberal Democrats. On stage, though, Johnson and Corbyn appeared strangely dwarfed in front of a set that appeared borrowed from Blade Runner.

The two candidates levelled numerous accusations at each other during their hour on stage – but which are to be believed? Conversation articles by academic experts provide informed perspectives, grounded in research. Here’s what they’ve had to say on the issues that arose.

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