Quantcast
Connect with us

WATCH: Alabama man shuts down cops who questioned him for jogging while black — and it’s perfect

Published

on

An Alabama man recorded himself shutting down two police officers who questioned him for jogging while black.

The man, identified as Corey Dickerson, was out of breath and resting after a hard sprint when an officer pulls up in his patrol car to ask who he is and where he is going, reported The Free Thought Project.

Dickerson, of Talladega, asks the officer if he has done anything wrong, and then he calmly and politely refuses to give his name or state his business.

ADVERTISEMENT

“You look like you been running,” the officer says, and Dickerson agrees he has been. “Where you been running from?”

The jogger says he has been running “just around,” and says he’s headed “nowhere in particular.”

Dickerson tells the officer he’s carrying identification and gives his first name, and the officer pulls over to park.

“Well,” pants Dickerson, still out of breath, “looks like I’m about to get harassed.”

Dickerson tells the officer he intends to stay at the front of the patrol car in full view of the dashboard camera, and he notifies the officer that he is recording the encounter on his cell phone, which automatically uploads video.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Look, my camera does the same thing, and you can tell them why I stopped you,” the officer says. “It is 12:30 in the morning, I’ve had a lot of burglaries and thefts. You can get this on camera, so now I’m just asking you for your ID.”

Alabama is a “stop and identify” state, which means law enforcement officers may “stop any person abroad in a public place whom he reasonably suspects is committing, has committed or is about to commit a felony or other public offense and may demand of him his name, address and an explanation of his actions.”

Dickerson is familiar with the law, and he repeatedly asks the officer, who agrees to identify himself as Officer Price, if he is suspected of a crime and, if so, which crime.

ADVERTISEMENT

A second officer arrives, and Dickerson says he had passed that same officer twice that night without being stopped.

The second officer recalls seeing Dickerson jogging on a sidewalk, and then he tries to explain to the jogger that police must investigate any suspicious activity they spot while on patrol.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I’m not a lawyer, don’t even pretend to be one, but I know that in order to detain me, you’ve got to have some type of reasonable suspicion that I’ve committed some type of crime,” Dickerson said. “I’m minding my own business out here, I’m literally jogging — exercising.”

The second officer explains that the first officer was reasonably suspicious that Dickerson was running in a neighborhood, but the jogger points out the first officer never actually saw him run.

“He literally seen me just standing right here,” Dickerson says. “I was literally bent over right here, catching my breath.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Dickerson and the second officer take turns establishing their credentials as reasonable men with good intentions.

The officer explains that police are on alert after a woman from Pennsylvania who lived nearby had been targeted twice by thieves, and Dickerson recalled later that he actually knew that woman, but those incidents had happened several years ago and the woman had since moved away.

The officer also says police must be vigilant due to shootings in the area, but Dickerson said he was worried about gun violence, too, but pointed out that most shootings involved teenagers.

“I’m a grown man, I’ve got three kids,” he says.

ADVERTISEMENT

Dickerson concedes he doesn’t follow every law all the time, but he said police had no reason to stop or search him.

“I don’t mean to interrupt you, but I don’t trust police just because I got my hair pulled out, I was choked, tased, maced, beaten bloody — you hear me? beaten bloody — by four cops while I was in handcuffs,” Dickerson claims. “One bad apples spoils the whole bunch for me.”

The second officer says they could search him for weapons if they chose to, but he says they don’t intend to take the encounter that far.

“If he wants to push it far enough, he can even arrest you for failure to identify,” the officer says.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Is that a real law?” Dickerson asks. “I’m going to look that up tonight — if I don’t go to jail.”

The officer tries to explain why his colleague was suspicious, and says all police wanted was his name and date of birth to determine whether he was wanted on an open warrant.

“That’s another thing, I might have warrants, though,” Dickerson says. “I’d be a fool to give you guys my name, then I go to jail and lose my job. I don’t have no bail money, no bond money.”

The officer asks if he has any open warrants, and Dickerson says he doubts it.

“Last time I went to court (two weeks ago), nobody tried to arrest me,” he says.

ADVERTISEMENT

Dickerson explains he was cited for trespassing during a dispute with a girlfriend in Knoxville, and the officer agrees that he would have been arrested if he was wanted on another warrant.

The video ends at that point as Dickerson called his sister, and he was not arrested.

Watch video of the encounter posted online by The Free Thought Project:

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump tells Fox News the ‘Black Lives Matter’ sign on Fifth Avenue is like he’s being ‘prosecuted’

Published

on

President Donald Trump appeared to reveal another quid pro quo during an interview with Fox News host Sean Hannity.

MSNBC's Lawrence O'Donnell pointed it out during an interview with Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA).

"I was very nice to Mayor de Blasio. I got him ventilators when he needed them... I got him the gowns. I got him the masks. I got him everything. Then he throws a big Black Lives Matter sign right down in the middle of Fifth Avenue. I was so good to him and to Gov. Cuomo, like nobody's ever been good. And then all you end up doing out of that place is getting prosecuted."

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow details all of the places the Trump-Pence COVID-19 ‘road show’ has spread the coronavirus

Published

on

President Donald Trump's COVID-19 Road Show is off to another super-spreading extravaganza this weekend as the campaign heads to New Hampshire.

During her final commentary Thursday, MSNBC's Rachel Maddow recalled that Tulsa, Oklahoma did everything they could to try and keep people safe while waiting for the Trump rally and during the event. The Bank of Oklahoma Center, where the rally was held, purchased stickers that said not to sit on specific seats to keep people physically distant. Trump's team told the BOK Center to remove them.

"It was the most space anywhere in America since the coronavirus crisis began," said Maddow.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Trump brags doctors were ‘surprised’ he could pass a cognitive test

Published

on

President Donald Trump told Fox News host Sean Hannity that he has taken a cognitive test and passed with flying colors. Bragging about it, however, he let it slip that the doctors didn't have much faith in him.

The comment came as Hannity asked Trump about former Vice President Joe Biden's comment that he has "cognitive tests" all the time. Biden was referencing that he must deal with serious and complex issues frequently and that those things take a cognitive aptitude that he doesn't believe the current president has.

Trump dismissed Biden's comments saying that Biden "meant" that he gets tested for the coronavirus all the time. Biden did address that and said that he hasn't wanted to be tested because he doesn't want to take someone else's place in line that truly needs a test. Trump has mocked Biden for staying inside under quarantine.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image