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Texas move could delay Supreme Court immigration review until after Obama leaves office

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Texas on Monday asked the U.S. Supreme Court for more time to file court papers in its dispute with the federal government over President Barack Obama’s executive action on immigration, a move that could delay a ruling in the case until after Obama leaves office.

Twenty-six Republican-governed states led by Texas sued to stop Obama’s 2014 plan to protect millions of illegal immigrants from deportation. Lower courts blocked the executive action, prompting the Justice Department on Friday to launch an appeal to the Supreme Court.

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If the request made by Texas Solicitor General Scott Keller for a 30-day extension for filing court papers is granted, it could run out the clock on the court being able to hear the case in its current term, which runs until June.

The Obama administration opposes the extension, according to Keller’s letter, and could counter by asking the court to expedite the case, legal experts say. A Justice Department spokesman did not immediately respond to a request seeking comment.

If Texas gets its way and the court ultimately decides to hear the dispute without expediting it, oral arguments would not be held until fall 2016 with a ruling not likely until after Obama leaves office in January 2017.

The Obama administration maintains Texas and the other states have no legal basis to challenge Obama’s action. The states contends Obama overstepped his presidential powers by bypassing Congress and acting unilaterally.

Obama’s executive order would let up to 4.7 million illegal immigrants live in the United States without threat of deportation. It was directed at people with no criminal records whose children are U.S. citizens.

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(Reporting by Lawrence Hurley; Editing by Will Dunham)


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White House goes into lockdown as George Floyd protests in DC rage hotter

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On Friday, CBS News reporter Weijia Jiang reported that the White House has now issued lockdown orders.

The development comes as protests against the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota have spread to Washington, D.C. and crowds are growing angrier. Earlier in the evening, a protester scaled the wall of a federal building and spray-painted an obscene anti-Trump message above a window.

The White House is currently under lockdown orders. https://t.co/LasnCIjkum

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‘Virtual terrorism’: Far-right trolls are targeting marginalized groups on Zoom calls

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On May 14, thirty-one residents of an East Oakland neighborhood joined a videoconference call to meet with their neighborhood services coordinator to hear updates about upcoming community events and resources available to residents; the meetings, which took place regularly in person prior to the pandemic, recently transitioned to virtual videoconferencing app Zoom. Then, five minutes into the call, the number of attendees jumped up to 72.
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Trump’s baffling and cowardly press conference reveals a president completely unable to lead

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When the White House announced President Donald Trump would hold a press conference in the Rose Garden on Friday, many political reporters held on to their seats. Trump's performances are often unpredictable whirlwind displays, filled with lies, distractions, and attacks.

Already this week, Trump had tweeted a video in which a supporter of his said: "The only good Democrat is a dead Democrat." And Twitter decided to obscure one of his tweets on Friday morning because he had written "When the looting starts, the shooting starts" — a clear threat of violence toward the protesters in Minneapolis.

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