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US braces for ‘extreme weather event’ from space that could result in $2 trillion in damages

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Faced with the prospect of a massive solar flare that could destroy satellites, spacecraft, and vital telecommunications systems, the White House National Science and Technology Council has released plans to protect vital systems from being devastated, reports Business Insider.

According to the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center, the Earth is constantly being bombarded with charged subatomic particles, traveling on solar winds, that can normally be deflected by the planet’s magnetic field.

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However scientists warn that there is a 12 percent chance of Earth being hit with a mammoth solar storm in the next decade that could wreak over $2 trillion dollars in economic damage.

“You can think of the sun as kind of like a volcano,” explained Thomas Berger, director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) “It’s difficult to predict precisely when it’s going to erupt, but you can see the signs building up.”

While scientists admit they can’t stop the solar discharge, a distant early warning system can relay information of the oncoming solar storm at the speed of light, allowing delicate systems to be shut down before being destroyed.

The NOAA will soon replace an antiquated satellite — similar to a “tsunami buoy” — with a Deep Space Climate Observatory satellite (DSCOVR) at a midway point between Earth and the sun. At the first sign of a major solar flare, DSCOVR will notify Earth up to an hour before the planet is bombarded by with particles.

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“Using that we can say … ‘OK we know exactly how big this thing is and how bad it’s going to be,'” Berger explained.

Under the plan developed by the National Science and Technology Council, various departments have been directed to establish benchmarks, “creating engineering standards, developing vulnerability assessments, establishing decision points and thresholds for action, understanding risk, developing more effective mitigation procedures and practices, and enhancing response and recovery planning.”

The U.S. isn’t the only country taking threat of a massive solar outburst seriously. Thursday the European Space Agency (ESA) announced they are working with scientists from 14 European countries to develop their own network.

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Trump attacks the homeless for sleeping in ‘our best highways, our best streets’ and vows to ‘do something about it’

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President Donald Trump on Tuesday issued an angry broadside against America's homeless population.

The Washington Post's Josh Dawsey reports that Trump, during a conversation with reporters, complained that homeless people are living in "our best highways, our best streets, our best entrances to buildings."

The president then said that people who live in these buildings pay "tremendous taxes" and want "prestige," and then vowed that "we'll be doing something about it."

Trump says homeless people are living in "our best highways, our best streets, our best entrances to buildings" where people pay "tremendous taxes" and want "prestige." Says he's speaking to tenants who "want to leave the country." He adds: "We'll be doing something about it."

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‘SLAP CUFFS ON HIM NOW’: Internet hammers House Dems for treating Corey Lewandowski with kid gloves

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Trump loyalist Corey Lewandowski testified before the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday and it quickly devolved into a circus in which the former Trump campaign manager refused to answer basic questions from Democrats.

During the hearing, the House Judiciary Democrats sent out a tweet accusing the White House of orchestrating a coverup of the president's actions as outlined by special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

However, many Twitter users went on to hammer the Democrats for purportedly treating the constantly obfuscating and stalling Lewandowski with kid gloves.

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Trump responds to Cokie Roberts’ death by complaining that she ‘never treated me well’

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Journalist Cokie Roberts died on Tuesday and President Donald Trump didn't hesitate to make her passing all about himself.

Per CNN's Daniel Dale, Trump was asked by reporters if he had a comment about Roberts' death at the age of 75 this week, and he responded by complaining that she didn't give him favorable coverage.

"I never met her," the president replied. "She never treated me nicely. But I would like to wish her family well. She was a professional and I respect professionals... never treated me well, but I certainly respect her as a professional."

Per pool, here's Trump on the death of Cokie Roberts: “I never met her. She never treated me nicely. But I would like to wish her family well. She was a professional and I respect professionals...Never treated me well, but I certainly respect her as a professional.”

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