Quantcast
Connect with us

Woman who plowed into Oklahoma homecoming crowd killing 4 was not drunk: court documents

Published

on

A woman accused of killing four people and injuring dozens more at Oklahoma State University’s Oct. 24 homecoming parade had a blood alcohol content below the minimum level to be considered legally intoxicated, court papers showed.

According to a brief filed on Thursday with the Payne County District Court by defense attorney Tony Coleman, a blood draw conducted on the day of the accident showed that 25-year-old Adacia Chambers had a blood alcohol content of 0.01 percent.

ADVERTISEMENT

Due to a gag order, officials with the police department in Stillwater, Oklahoma, said on Friday they could not comment specifically on the case or the accuracy of the brief’s contents.

In Oklahoma, the minimum blood alcohol content to be considered under the influence is 0.08 percent for those 21 and older.

Chambers’ attorney, Coleman, had filed the brief in support of a motion requesting court funds to finance bringing in an expert witness in psychology and accident reconstruction.

The suspect’s father, Floyd Chambers, and her attorney have said she has a history of mental illness and sought treatment twice in recent years.

ADVERTISEMENT

Facing four counts of second-degree murder and 46 counts of assault and battery, Chambers is due back in court on Dec. 10 and is currently being held in lieu of $1 million bond.

(Reporting by Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton in Tulsa; Editing by Jon Herskovitz and Sandra Maler)

ADVERTISEMENT

Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

CNN

Max Boot calls BS on Republicans for trying to claim Syria is Nancy Pelosi’s fault because of impeachment

Published

on

President Donald Trump is conducting foreign policy like a 1980s television character, according to conservative Washington Post columnist Max Boot.

In a panel discussion about the letter Trump sent to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, Boot mocked Republicans for suddenly trying to claim that Trump's withdrawal from Syria was Speaker Nancy Pelosi's fault because of impeachment. It is unclear if Republicans are confessing the president is too distracted by impeachment to be making foreign policy decisions or if they are blaming Pelosi for military decisions.

"I mean there's a lot of really lame Republican talking points out there, Don," Boot said to CNN host Don Lemon. "But to suggest, as Rep. Liz Cheney and others have done that somehow Trump's inexplicable decision to give the Turks the green light to invade Syria — that was somehow the fault of Nancy Pelosi because of the impeachment process? What?"

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

US military had to bomb our own base in Syria because of Trump’s mistakes — and one Republican is furious

Published

on

President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw in Syria in less than 24 hours put American troops at risk as they were being fired on by Turkey. However, according to the Wall Street Journal , the military was also forced to bomb our own military base.

Republican Rep. Adam Kinzinger, who has been critical of Trump's decisions in the past months, pointed out the factoid in a tweet Wednesday evening, asking, "Is this the America you grew up believing in?"

https://twitter.com/RepKinzinger/status/1184650759377473536

"On Wednesday, the U.S. military said two F-15E jet fighters carried out an airstrike to destroy an ammunition-storage facility, latrines, tents and other parts of the Syria headquarters of the American campaign to destroy Islamic State after pulling its forces from the base," reported The Journal.

Continue Reading
 

CNN

Ex-counterintel official explains how lobbying laws could bring down Rudy Giuliani

Published

on

On Wednesday's edition of CNN's "Cuomo Prime Time," former Justice Department counterintelligence official David Laufman explained to Chris Cuomo how President Donald Trump's attorney Rudy Giuliani could go down for violations of the Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA).

"Why does this matter, this area of the law?" asked Cuomo.

"This was a statute enacted in the 1930s in response to pro-Nazi German elements of the United States, engaged in subversive propaganda activities so that the U.S. people or lawmakers when confronted with content, whether lobbying or an op-ed, can make an informed assessment based on who the real party is behind it," explained Laufman. "If it's a foreign party, the American people should be able to take that into account and assigning whatever weight they want."

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image