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Trump goes full birther against Cruz — and gets accused of ‘jumping the shark’

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Trump casts doubt on Cruz’s eligibility for the presidency on the basis that he was born in Canada, echoing his earlier false claim that Obama was born in Kenya

Donald Trump cast doubt on Republican candidate Ted Cruz’s eligibility for the presidency on Tuesday, on the basis that he may not be a US citizen.

In an interview with the Washington Post, Trump said the fact that Cruz was born in Canada was a “very precarious one for Republicans because he’d be running and the courts may take a long time to make a decision. You don’t want to be running and have that kind of thing over your head.”

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The Republican frontrunner went on to claim a “lot of people are talking about … the fact that he was born in Canada and he has had a double passport.”

Cruz, whose campaign declined to comment, was born in Calgary in 1971. Although his father Rafael was not an American citizen at the time, his Delaware-born mother, Eleanor, was. Article II of the US constitution requires that “no person except a natural born Citizen … shall be eligible to the Office of President.”

However, legal scholars have long interpreted natural born citizen to refer to whether someone acquired their citizenship at birth, not the geographic location where they were born. As a result, Cruz, who was a citizen at birth, is natural born.

Cruz has been reluctant to directly engage Trump during the Republican debate season, however this episode did prompt a feisty tweet from the Texas senator.

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He posted as his response to “@realDonaldTrump calling into question my natural-born citizenship,” a YouTube clip of the character Fonzie from Happy Days “jumping the shark”. This moment was seen as an irreversible downward turn for the show’s quality and has spawned the phrase “jumping the shark” for the moment when a once successful product permanently goes wrong.

Cruz was asked at a November campaign stop in Chariton, Iowa, about the circumstances of his birth. Cruz said: “As a legal matter it is plain as day that a child of a US citizen born abroad is a natural born citizen. So will people raise this for political mischief? Sure, it’s politics, that’s what they do, but as a legal matter … it’s quite straightforward and I don’t believe there is any impediment whatsoever.”

Trump, who was one of the most vocal “birthers” pushing the false claim that Barack Obama was born in Kenya — which incidentally would still have made him a natural born citizen — has questioned Cruz’s citizenship in the past.

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In 2013, he told ABC News’ Jonathan Karl that the Texas senator might not be eligible to be president. “If he was born in Canada, then perhaps not. That will be ironed out. I don’t know the circumstances. If he says he was born in Canada, that’s his thing.”

A few Democrats have also questioned Cruz’s citizenship. Florida congressman Alan Grayson called Cruz “a Canadian” in 2014 and said he was not eligible to serve in the White House.


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Millions around the world joined #ClimateStrike — demanding bold climate action

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Masses of children skipped school Friday to join a global strike against climate change that teen activist Greta Thunberg said was "only the beginning" in the fight against environmental disaster.

Some four million people filled city streets around the world, organizers said, in what was billed as the biggest ever protest against the threat posed to the planet by rising temperatures.

Youngsters and adults alike chanted slogans and waved placards in demonstrations that started in Asia and the Pacific, spread across Africa, Europe and Latin America, before culminating in the United States where Thunberg rallied.

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Trump announces new sanctions on Iran — and deploys US troops to the Middle East

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The United States announced Friday that it was sending military reinforcements to the Gulf region following attacks on Saudi oil facilities that it attributes to Iran, just hours after President Donald Trump ordered new sanctions on Tehran.

Trump said the sanctions were the toughest-ever against another country, but indicated he did not plan a military strike, calling restraint a sign of strength.

The Treasury Department renewed action against Iran's central bank after US officials said Tehran carried out weekend attacks on rival Saudi Arabia's oil infrastructure, which triggered a spike in global crude prices.

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‘Do a lot of stupid sh*t as quickly as possible’: Ambassador Power breaks down ’The Trump Doctrine’

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The former ambassador to the United Nations explained "The Trump Doctrine" during a Friday evening interview with comedian Bill Maher on HBO's "Real Time."

Samantha Power, the author of the new book, The Education of an Idealist, was asked by Maher about the foreign policy mantra of the Obama administration.

"Obama's foreign policy doctrine was famously summarized as 'don't do stupid sh*t," Maher noted. "Trump's, of course, is 'Do stupid sh*t.'"

"Do stupid sh*t as quickly as possible," Power clarified.

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