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Flint investigator says involuntary manslaughter charges possible

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The mayor of Flint, Michigan, which is struggling to cope with dangerous levels of lead in its drinking water, said on Tuesday the city would replace all residents’ pipes and was counting on state and federal help to foot the estimated $55 million bill.

The city of some 100,000 people was under control of a state-appointed emergency manager in 2014 when it switched its source of water from Detroit’s municipal system to the Flint River to save money.

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That move has provoked a national controversy and prompted several lawsuits by parents who say their children are showing dangerously high blood levels of lead, which can cause development problems. Lead can be toxic and children are especially vulnerable.

“We’re going to restore safe drinking water one house at a time, one child at a time,” the city’s Democratic mayor, Karen Weaver, told reporters, adding she expected the state’s Republican governor, Rick Snyder, to back the move.

Flint switched back to Detroit water in October after tests found high levels of lead in samples of children’s blood. The more corrosive water from the river leached more lead from the city pipes than Detroit water did.

The former Wayne County prosecutor tapped to lead the state’s investigation into the crisis said on Tuesday he was looking to see whether any of the officials who signed off on the change acted criminally.

“We’re here to investigate what possible crimes there are, anything from involuntary manslaughter … to misconduct in office,” the investigator, Todd Flood told reporters in Lansing. He said the probe is underway but declined to provide details.

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Snyder, who critics have called on to step down, has repeatedly apologized for the state’s poor handling of the crisis.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit also is investigating the crisis.

On Monday, the state Board of Canvassers approved a recall petition for Snyder. The petition calls for his removal from office due to an executive order he signed last year related to the move of the school reform office away from the state education department and into the department of technology management and budget, a secretary of state spokesman said.

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The board of canvassers previously rejected recall petitions related to the Flint water crisis, the spokesman said. The group that filed the petition must now collect nearly 800,000 signatures in a 60-day period over the next 180 days to get it on the ballot.

(Reporting by Ben Klayman; Editing by Scott Malone and James Dalgleish)

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BUSTED: Florida’s GOP governor illegally denied Miami Herald access to coronavirus briefing

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Gov. Ron DeSantis denied the Miami Herald access to a COVID-19 coronavirus briefing, the newspaper's Tallahassee Bureau Chief reported Saturday.

"Gov. Ron DeSantis decided to violate the state's public meeting laws and chose to exclude the Miami Herald and Tampa Bay Times from a media briefing at the Capitol," Mary Ellen Klas reported.

"His media staff told another reporter, NSF's Jim Turner, that if he insisted that we be allowed in, Turner would be kept out," she noted.

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Experts pour cold water of Trump’s proposal to lock down New York with a two-week quarantine

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On Saturday, President Donald Trump raised the possibility that he might impose a quarantine on the states of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut to contain the spread of coronavirus. But his suggestion has not met a receptive audience from experts.

Conservative Naval War College professor Tom Nichols pointed out that Trump doesn't have the authority to order such a quarantine in the first place. And former White House Press Secretary Joel Lockhart noted if it did happen, it would be stunningly authoritarian.

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Michigan governor’s former opponent slams ‘inept’ Trump for petty attacks: ‘I’ve got her back’

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On Saturday, former Michigan gubernatorial candidate Abdul El-Sayed clapped back at President Donald Trump for his attacks on Gov. Gretchen Whitmer:

#ThatWomanInMichigan is @GovWhitmer. I ran against her. And though we may not always agree on everything, I know how tough she is.

Leading in crisis is hard. It’s even HARDER when the President is inept. I admire the work she’s putting in for our state. And I’ve got her back.

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