Here are 36 things discussed more often in the presidential primary debates than drug issues
Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio speaks as rival Donald Trump (R) listens during the Republican U.S. presidential candidates debate sponsored by CNN at the University of Miami in Miami, Florida on March 10, 2016. (Reuters/Carlo Allegri)

This article was originally published by The Influence, a news site that covers the full spectrum of human relationships with drugs. Follow The Influence on Facebook or Twitter.


The 2016 presidential race has defied almost everyone’s expectations. Whether it’s building a wall along the Mexican border, the KKK, or hating on all Muslims, the topics have been “surprising,” to say the least. To help us make sense of it all, The New York Times has just released a graphic mapping the subjects most mentioned during presidential debates so far.

You might think that with tens of thousands of drug-related fatalities per year in the US -- far more than from Islamic terrorism, for example, which has resulted in 29 deaths on US soil during the past decade -- US drug problems would be high on the list.

Not so much. Here are 36 things that have been discussed more during presidential debates than drug issues:

1. Islamic State

2. Immigration

3. Taxes

4. Healthcare

5. Military Power

6. Jobs

7. Iran

8. Guns

9. Anti-Washington

10. Budget and debt

11. Education

12. Ground troops

13. Reagan

14. Criminal justice

15. Syria

16. Russia

17. Trade

18. Constitution

19. Race

20. Sept. 11 attacks

21. Wall Street

22. Income inequality

23. Climate Change

24. China

25. Supreme court

26. Libya

27. Campaign finance

28. Veterans

29. Iraq/Afghanistan

30. North Korea

31. Clean energy

32. Abortion

33. Social Security

34. Infrastructure

35. Israel

36. Refugees

Drug issues aren’t quite bottom of the pile, however. This detail from the Times graphic shows some of the subjects that have been discussed slightly less often. Hand size is our favorite.

NYTgraphic

This article was originally published by The Influence, a news site that covers the full spectrum of human relationships with drugs. Follow The Influence on Facebook or Twitter.