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Idaho Republican: Bibles in public schools ruled constitutional by ‘little Supreme Court in my head’

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Idaho Republican Sage Dixon (Facebook)

The Idaho House of Representatives has passed legislation allowing references to the Bible in public schools in direct contradiction to the state constitution, the Spokesman-Review reports.

The bill that says use of the Bible is “expressly permitted” passed the House on Monday, even though the Idaho attorney general said such a law is “specifically prohibited” by the state’s own governing document. The Idaho Constitution says, “No books, papers, tracts or documents of a political, sectarian or denominational character shall be used.”

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According to the Review, the bill’s Republican sponsor, state Rep. Sage Dixon, referred to voices in his head for approval, saying, “The little Supreme Court in my head says this is OK.”

The paper reports that Dixon and fellow supporters pushed for the bill by arguing the Bible is not sectarian, but the holy book was specifically mentioned because it is “under attack.” Dixon further said, “There are many religions that refer back to the Bible in their tenets.”

An effort to soften the bill by changing the wording from “Bible” to “religious texts” failed to pass muster, according to the Review.

Republican state Rep. Fred Wood opposed the bill saying it would cost taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars in an inevitable court battle.

“I just want my constituents to know back home, this is not a vote against religion or the Bible or anything else,” he told the Review. “What this is a vote against is needlessly wasting the taxpayers’ dollars.”

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The bill has already been approved by the state Senate, and now heads to the governor’s desk.


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2020 Election

Trump attacks 2 GOP governors on flight to Georgia rally: ‘Republicans will NEVER forget this’

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Republicans have been "working frantically behind the scenes" to keep President Donald Trump on message during his Saturday campaign rally in Georgia, but the efforts do not seem to be working.

GOP strategists hoped Trump would make the case for the two GOP senators in the January runoff elections that will decide control of the U.S. Senate, but Trump has continued to fixate on his delusions that he won the presidential election.

Aboard Air Force One on the flight to the rally, Trump attacked two GOP governors: Brian Kemp of Georgia and Doug Ducey of Arizona -- and seemed to threaten political retribution for the pair not going along with the president's debunked conspiracy theories about the election.

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Trump holds large rally in Georgia — one day after the Peach State set a new coronavirus record

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President Donald Trump departed the White House on Saturday for an evening campaign rally in Georgia -- despite the coronavirus pandemic.

Trump is ostensively making the trip to support Sen. David Perdue (R-GA) and interim Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R-GA) in the January runoff elections that will decide control of the U.S. Senate. However, Republicans fear Trump will use his speech to continue bashing GOP Gov. Brian Kemp.

Trump's visit also comes against the backdrop of the coronavirus pandemic.

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2020 Election

Panicked Republicans ‘working frantically behind the scenes’ — but Trump just keeps attacking GOP Gov Brian Kemp

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Republicans are worried that President Donald Trump will pour gasoline on the intraparty inferno burning in Georgia.

Trump is officially traveling to the Peach State for a rally in support of the two Republican senators in January runoff elections that will decide control of the U.S. Senate.

Republicans worry Trump will continue to attack Republican Gov. Brian Kemp as he has on Twitter.

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1335268230206722048

"Trump is to headline a campaign rally for Sens. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler in the state Saturday night — his first major political event since before the Nov. 3 election. GOP officials are working frantically behind the scenes to try to keep the president on script at the rally, worried that he will use the forum to attack Kemp and other state GOP officials who have resisted his pressure, according to a person familiar with the discussions," The Washington Post reported Saturday.

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