Quantcast
Connect with us

Oral Roberts University bans woman for ‘unscriptural sexual acts’ after her same-sex marriage

Published

on

Sabrina Bradford, 30, enrolled at Oral Roberts University four years ago to pursue a degree in social work. But last year after the Supreme Court made same-sex marriage legal in all 50 states, Sabrina and her now wife Ophelia got their marriage license.

With just one semester before earning her degree, Sabrina can no longer enroll in new classes for next semester because the school says that she has violated the honor code. According to the Tulsa World, ORU’s Code of Honor Pledge includes, among other rules, that students must agree to refrain from participating in “unscriptural sexual acts.” According to ORU that includes homosexual activity, same-sex marriage and premarital sex.

ADVERTISEMENT

The thing that makes it even more bizarre is that the school wouldn’t tell her why she wasn’t allowed to return at first. When she submitted her financial aid application in August before her final semester began she indicated that she was married. Just two days later, the Vice President for Student Life, Daniel Guajardo, and Dean of Women, Lori Cook, sat down with her to explain she could not finish her degree.

“I think there’s some due-process issues and some administrative issues in the sense that they kind of put her in limbo,” Sabrina’s attorney Alyssa Bryant explained. “They didn’t tell her she was suspended or expelled. When she asked why (she couldn’t return), they wouldn’t tell her in writing. Everything was kept verbal initially.”

When asked for a statement the school would only cite Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act and refused to say anything more.

“A student’s signature on the honor code constitutes acceptance of the entire honor code and completes a contract between the student and ORU, which is a prerequisite for matriculation as well as the student’s continued association with ORU,” Ossie Mills, vice president of communications and marketing said.

Honor codes required by right-wing religious colleges are generally upheld in court much like Terms of Service for websites or the updates iPhone sends you that you never read.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sabrina’s attorney isn’t sure if they’ll sue the University yet, but she believes ORU’s code of conduct could violate Title IX, which prohibits sex-based discrimination in education. ORU is eligible to apply to be exempt from parts of Title IX if they consider something to be against their beliefs and they have had an exemption since 1985 according to the school’s spokesman.

“You shouldn’t be persecuted for being married to someone that you love,” Sabrina said. “I believe that we were all created in God’s image and likeness. I can understand not wanting to support the idea of same-sex marriage, but when it comes to reality, this is an educational system — whether you have a personal bias against homosexuals or not, you accepted me as a student.”


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Aides scramble to satisfy Trump’s need for adulation from big crowds during a pandemic: report

Published

on

In the wake of President Trump's less-than-stellar campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, campaign aides scrambled to reschedule another one in order to redeem themselves, setting their sights in the state of New Hampshire for their next event.

But the event was abruptly called off, thanks to an incoming tropical storm that never materialized. But according to inside sources speaking to POLITICO, the cancelation was more due to concerns about attendance -- a concern that underscores a challenge for the Trump campaign: how to satiate Trump's need for big crowds in the midst of a pandemic.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘Complete and utter moron’: Anti-mask Republican derided after he ‘dismantles himself’ amid grilling from CNN host

Published

on

Florida State Rep. Anthony Sabatini (R) is facing a backlash online after appearing Wednesday on CNN to argue against mask mandates, which are intended to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Sabatini told CNN host Brianna Keilar that mask mandates were a violation of Florida's constitution. "This is something government has never done before. We've never had government telling people what you have to do with your own face," he said.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Florida man caught on video pulling gun and threatening to kill shopper who asked him to wear a mask

Published

on

A man shopping in a Florida Walmart pulled a gun and threatened to kill a shopper who asked him to wear a mask, according to police, NBC Miami reports.

Surveillance video shows an unmasked man pushing an elderly man in a wheelchair in the store this Saturday. A masked shopper approaches the pair and words are exchanged, prompting the man to give the masked shopper the middle finger. Soon after, the man pulls a gun from his waistband, allegedly threatening to kill the shopper before he leaves the store.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image