This Virginia man just agreed to give up his guns because of a bizarre ‘suspicious bacon’ incident
Evan Patrick Cater

A Virginia man agreed to give up his guns for two years after accepting a plea agreement in a bizarre neighborhood dispute.


Evan Patrick Cater was accused of wearing a camouflage mask Oct. 18 and going onto his neighbor's property with a gun and a suspicious bag of bacon, reported the Richmond Times- Dispatch.

The neighbor, Bobby Wood, heard his dogs barking and went outside to investigate, and he told police that he spotted a shadowy figure but couldn't tell who was there.

Deputies arrested the 31-year-old Cater, who lives in Madison Heights, hiding behind the neighbor's dog kennel wearing full camouflage and carrying a fully loaded semi-automatic handgun.

Deputies also found a bag of raw bacon lying nearby, covered with a sticky substance that investigators later determined was engine lubricant oil.

Cater, who smelled of alcohol and was lying face-down on the ground, told deputies that he was "just relaxing -- I'm not doing anything wrong."

Deputies learned that Cater and his neighbor had "bad blood" after Woods tried to obtain an ordinance to make their neighborhood a "no-shoot zone," and which the the Amherst County Board of Supervisors passed a month before the suspicious bacon incident.

Prosecutors dropped a felony charge of wearing a mask in public and two misdemeanor counts of drunk in public and attempting to poison a companion animal after taking Cater's military service and clear criminal record into account.

But Woods feared his neighbor having access to guns after his “unusual and frightening behavior" near the dog kennel, and prosecutors agreed.

Cater pleaded guilty Wednesday to misdemeanor counts of carrying a gun while intoxicated and trespassing, and he was given a two-year suspended sentence.

He gave up his right to possess a firearm for two years and consented to be searched at any time by law enforcement.

Cater handed over his concealed carry permit to a bailiff before leaving court, and he can't apply for a new one for five years.