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Nashville mayor ‘deeply concerned’ about lost tourist revenue resulting from anti-gay state law

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Nashville Mayor Megan Barry told reporters she is “deeply concerned” about lost revenue to Nashville city coffers as a result of legislation that allows counselors to turn away LGBT patients, WKRN reports.

Barry told the station she hopes businesses and organizations don’t punish the city for actions taken at the state level after several conventions have already been cancelled.

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“I am deeply concerned about the loss of revenue to our city because of action taken by the state legislature,” she told WKRN. “Come to Nashville. We are a warm and welcoming place. And we really don’t want the cities to be punished for things that the states may do.”

Prior to the bill’s passage, the American Counseling Association condemned it, and since it went into law, at least three groups have cancelled scheduled meetings in Nashville.

Barry cautioned that Nashville, Tennessee’s capital city and home to the country music industry, generates a large amount of revenue for the rest of the state and Davidson County.

“At the end of the day, we generate a tremendous amount of money in Davidson County that the entire state benefits from, and I want us to continue to be that revenue generator and that economic engine that keeps Tennessee a great place to be,”she told WKRN.

Watch the report, from WKRN, as posted here:

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2020 Election

Will Amy Klobuchar carry water for the ‘worst company in the world’?

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The politerati just can’t get over how good Amy Klobuchar is at losing. A longtime favorite of many Beltway pundits for her high approval rating in her home state of Minnesota, Klobuchar’s third-place finish in the New Hampshire primary was somehow a bigger deal to many in the media than Senator Bernie Sanders’ actual victory. Klobuchar’s national support is so low she doesn’t even register on some of the latest national polls, yet she’s somehow still the candidate to watch. And if you disagree, clearly you’re just not “in the know.”

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A military perspective on climate change could bridge the gap between believers and doubters

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As experts warn that the world is running out of time to head off severe climate change, discussions of what the U.S. should do about it are split into opposing camps. The scientific-environmental perspective says global warming will cause the planet severe harm without action to slow fossil fuel burning. Those who reject mainstream climate science insist either that warming is not occurring or that it’s not clear human actions are driving it.

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