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‘Bring the kids’: Neo-Nazis plan picnic to make Pennsylvania county a white supremacist hotbed again

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White supremacists are hoping to re-establish a stronghold in a rural Pennsylvania county.

The National Socialist Movement of Pennsylvania is planning an event next week in Potter County, which had been the home of the Aryan World Congress more than a decade ago, reported The Bradford Era.

The Aug. 13 event is planned near Ulysses, where the consortium of skinheads, Ku Klux Klan members, neo-Nazis and “white power” bands had a presence in the early 2000s.

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The National Socialist Movement is distributing fliers inviting “white patriots” to the 4 p.m. event, although the exact address hasn’t been revealed yet, and urged like-minded racists to “bring the kids.”

It’s not clear whether any children’s entertainment — such as clowns tying up swastika-shaped balloons — has been scheduled for the event, but the group promises a swastika will be lit at dusk.

Organizers plan discussions about recent shootings of police officers and violence at Donald Trump rallies, which they blame on the Republican presidential nominee’s opponents.

“We don’t advocate any kind of violence because it’s just self-defeating and stupid,” said group leader Steve Bowers.

Nearby residents are planning a peaceful protest to show the white supremacists they aren’t welcome in the county, which is just south of the New York state border.

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“Our country needs people to unite it, not divide it,” said state Rep. Martin Causer (R-Turtlepoint). “It needs more cooperation and understanding, not hate and anger.”

Bowers, whose real name is Steve Nastasi, said the event would be held on private property owned by a white supremacists who lives in the area.

“Pennsylvania’s always been a stronghold of white resistance,” Bowers said.

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Mark Pitcavage, of the Anti-Defamation League, said the event should not raise alarms about widespread support for white supremacism, and he cautioned against antagonizing the group’s members.

“They will probably let other white supremacists in as well, but the event is not likely to be large,” Pitcavage said. “An event like this occurring in an area does not imply that the area is chock-full of white supremacists, so people do not need to do any great soul-searching on that part. Such events are always reminders, however, that hate and white supremacy has not gone away, and if offers an opportunity for communities to be vocal in their opposition to hate.”

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Trump evangelicals abandoned the Sermon on the Mount and replaced it with the ‘Trumpian order’: Historian Jon Meacham

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In an op-ed for the New York Times this Tuesday, historian Jon Meacham discusses the state of Christianity in America during the age of Donald Trump. He points out that Christianity, especially in the hands of Trump-supporting evangelicals, has lost its moral authority in the eyes of many Americans. Understandable, since the hero of millions of Christians "has used the National Prayer Breakfast to mock the New Testament injunction to love one’s enemies."

But according to Meacham, "history suggests that religiously inspired activism may hold the best hope for those in resistance to the prevailing Trumpian order."

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Devin Nunes’ income called into question as watchdog asks for investigation of his finances

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According to a report from the Fresno Bee,the non-partisan Campaign Legal Center is requesting a federal investigation into whether U.S. Representative Devin Nunes (R-CA) is receiving legal services in violation of House ethics rules.

Over the past year, the conservative Republicans has launched a handful of lawsuits against critics -- including the McClatchy newspaper chain and a person on Twitter purporting to be one of his cows.

According to the Bee, "The complaint says Nunes appears to be in 'blatant violation of House rules,' because he would have trouble paying for all these lawsuits solely from his congressional salary of $174,000 per year. The group argues he’d only be able to pay if he received legal services for free, at a discounted rate, or based on a contingency fee, meaning the lawyer would get compensated from Nunes’ winnings if he prevails in his lawsuits."

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2020 Election

$1,750+ ticket prices for South Carolina debate spark outrage

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"I think it speaks to the fundamental, endemic corruption of the Democratic Party establishment that you had to pay... multiple thousands of dollars to get into that room."

Unusually loud booing and jeering directed disproportionately at Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren during Tuesday night's Democratic presidential debate—particularly when the senators criticized billionaire businessman Michael Bloomberg—sparked probing questions about the class composition of the audience packed inside the Gaillard Center in Charleston, South Carolina.

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