Quantcast
Connect with us

Prominent black lawyer denied entry into exclusive club while whites were buzzed in

Published

on

Selwyn Pieters is a prominent black lawyer in Toronto and when the security guard denied him entry to the law society’s headquarters he said he was humiliated.

He was visiting the headquarters in July with a group of black students. The guard asked to see his law society identity card while white people entering were buzzed in without the same request. His card ended up being expired, so the guard denied him entry. The protocol for expired ID cards is for the guard to call for a database check, but that didn’t happen in this case.

ADVERTISEMENT

He’s now filing a complaint that demands $75,000 in damage and asking the tribunal order the Law Society of Upper Canada to implement a training for anti-black racism for all security guards, lawyers and other employees.

“The attitude was I could not be a lawyer. What the guard did to me was quite shocking. I’m very upset about it,” Pieters told The Canadian Press. “It’s based on the fact that I’m black and I believe based on the fact that I have dreadlocks.” He further said that the treatment both “fosters and perpetuates” the frequent exclusion of black lawyers.

“The security guard relied on stereotypes about race, colour, creed and ethnicity to single out me and my student out for greater scrutiny or different treatment,” he said. “In effect, I was racially profiled. As well, my student was racially profiled.”

Robert Lapper, the society’s top executive said in a letter to Pieters he believes that the security guard followed proper procedure and no profiling took place.

If it was a matter of the fact that the guard recognized the white members and not him, Pieters explained that everyone should know him since the society’s Facebook page loves displaying him in photographs as he is one of few black people that attends.

ADVERTISEMENT

This isn’t the first time it’s happened to Pieters either. Three years ago, Ontario’s top court upheld a tribunal finding of racial discrimination when Pieters and two other African American people with him were asked for ID when entering the lawyers’ lounge at a courthouse in Brampton, Ont. Whites weren’t asked for ID.

“It’s almost like an exact repeat,” Pieters said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Internet buries Meaghan McCain for ‘rude and condescending’ Twitter attack on critics of her ‘The View’ antics

Published

on

On Saturday morning "The View" co-host Meghan McCain snapped back at some of her online critics who complained about her observations and demeanor on the popular ABC show -- which was not received very well as one might expect.

According to conservative commentator -- who also is the daughter of the late Sen. John McCain -- wrote:  "It’s called “The View”... I am paid to give another view. If you’re deeply triggered by a diversity of opinions and want to watch a show where everyone just sits around agreeing with one another on everything, feel free to find a show called “The Same”...."

Continue Reading

2020 Election

At Joe Biden’s eleventh-hour rally in Nevada, many union members remain uncommitted

Published

on

On the eve of the Nevada caucuses, former Vice President Joe Biden, who has referred to himself as "middle-class Joe," had a last-minute chance to connect with middle-class Nevada voters before Saturday's caucuses. At a barbecue with burgers, hot dogs, and ice cream sandwiches, attendees that included firefighters and iron workers gathered for what was advertised as a precinct captain training — or to simply hear Biden's pitch. Indeed, many attendees of the barbecue were still undecided a mere day before caucusing.

This article first appeared in Salon.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Trump’s NSC is ignoring intelligence reports and basing policy on handouts of Trump’s tweets: report

Published

on

According to a report from the New York Times, members of the National Security Council under Donald Trump no longer uses their extensive knowledge of international relations, politics, and history to formulate foreign policy security proposals for the president's review -- and are instead using the president's tweets to make policy based upon his desires and social media proclamations.

The report begins with noting that council members are often handed printouts of the president's tweets when they convene and are expected to use his words as their guide to formulate proposals that will likely find favor with the president.

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image