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WATCH: Keith Olbermann’s urgent Election Day plea: A vote for Trump is ‘national suicide’

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Political commentator Keith Olbermann gave his final remarks ahead of Tuesday’s election in a morning segment of The Closer.

Olbermann explained the high stakes of the 2016 Election, noting how Hillary Clinton is representing the Democratic Party and Donald Trump represents “national suicide.”

“The calendar says 2016,” Olbermann said, only to suggest that it might as well say 1864 “because not since that day exactly 152 years ago have we Americans voted on whether or not to put ourselves out of existence.”

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He continued, “Go forward with Hillary Clinton, who at the worst will be a good president, hamstrung by an obstructionist Congress … or put the full power of the government in the hands of an overwrought child, an amateur who believes he is God’s gift to mankind and always had too much money to be impacted by his own failures.”

Olbermann explained how American democracy is at risk, but not in the same way as in the past when foreign intervention is to blame. This time, he said, it was a “cancer, not merely growing within the country, but fed and fueled and nurtured and exploited by a psychopathic liar who has gamed democracy.”

He suggested that, if elected, Trump would “happily and immediately extinguish” basic American freedoms that the country’s democratic structure offers, while destroying that very democracy in the process. “That’s how deadly serious today is.”

“The Trump crisis of 2016, national suicide, the death of the United States of America can be prevented by voting.”

Wacth his remarks in full below.

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‘Donald who?’ Presidential historian predicts GOP support for Trump will erode in the face of a ‘blue wave’

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MSNBC's Jon Meacham predicts that President Donald Trump won't be able to count on Republican support through a lengthy vote-counting process.

The historian and author told MSNBC's "Morning Joe" that GOP support may wane if Democrats strengthen their House majority and take over the Senate from Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, even if the results of the presidential election aren't known until weeks later.

"There's a much better chance that Joe Biden will end up somewhat centering the Democratic Party than anybody is going to come along and center the Republican Party," Meacham said, "and I think that's an existential threat to a Republican Party that has sold its soul, the check bounced, and they've got to figure out what are they going to do to attempt to be something approaching majority party in this demographically changing country."

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Historian details how ‘anti-science’ views of white evangelicals in the South helped fuel the 2nd wave of COVID-19

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When the coronavirus pandemic was killing thousands of New York City residents in the spring, many far-right Republicans in Texas and the Deep South argued that they shouldn’t be forced to practice social distancing or wear protective face masks because of a Northeastern Corridor problem. They failed to realize that pandemics, from the Black Death in Medieval times to the Spanish flu in 1918/1919, can rapidly spread from one place to another. Historian Laura Ellyn Smith, in a blistering op-ed for the Washington Post, discusses the fact that COVID-19 has been hitting the South so hard recently — and argues that the “anti-science” views of far-right white Christian fundamentalists are partly to blame.

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Veteran Republican operative shames the GOP — and warns they won’t get rid of Trumpism ‘for at least a generation’

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Stuart Stevens is a veteran Republican campaign operative from five presidential races. When he spoke to PBS's Judy Woodruff Wednesday, he lamented the GOP failed the moral test it was presented with Donald Trump.

"Well, I think there's been two strains in the party. Call it an Eisenhower strain going back to the '50s and a McCarthy strain," Stevens said, recalling when the GOP would talk about expanding their party and bringing in more African-American voters. "Now we don't even hear any talk anymore of a big tent. And we seem to have settled into a very comfortable white grievance identity."

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