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Bill Maher warns of regressive marijuana laws under Trump: Federal raids are ‘quite possible’

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In an interview with ATTN:, Bill Maher spoke about the possible dark reality for marijuana users under Donald Trump’s regime, noting how the US could potential go back to a time before the substance was legal.

The outlet specifically pointed to Trump’s pick for attorney general, Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions, who has been a vocal opponent of marijuana legalization. Such a possibility has left some worried about what that would mean for the 28 states that have already legalized the substance.

As recently as a Senate hearing in April, Sessions announced, “good people don’t smoke marijuana,” adding that it’s “not the kind of thing that ought to be legalized.”

He continued:

We need grown-ups in charge in Washington to say marijuana is not the kind of thing that ought to be legalized, it ought not to be minimized, that it’s in fact a very real danger. I can’t tell you how concerning it is for me emotionally and personally to see the possibility that we would reverse the progress that we’ve made and let it slip away from us. Lives will be impacted, families will be broken up, children will be damaged.

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Maher told ATTN:, “I had one friend who went to jail way back in 2000 because, we made marijuana medically legal here in California in 1996. But the feds came in and said, ‘Sorry.'”

According to ATTN:, lawyer and author Jeffrey Dorf wrote that if a Session-backed law enforcement came to power and led a crackdown on legal marijuana, “No one would offer regulated marijuana under the state’s regime, for fear of a federal raid; state and local government would not expend many resources to combat illegal marijuana; and federal resources would be inadequate to police illegal marijuana in a way that substantially reduces supply. The net result would be to increase the power of drug gangs and the associated violence.”

Maher warned that it would not be unheard of under Trump to see such federal raids happening even in states where marijuana has been legalized. “I certainly think it’s possible,” he said.

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Watch the full interview below.


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Trump asked right-wing conspiracy theorist congressman to help him pick his next Director of National Intelligence

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On Monday, Politico reported that President Donald Trump is consulting with Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA) about who he should consider to replace Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats.

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Donald Trump on the US-Mexico Border

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The Examiner replied to Trump on Twitter, posting an article headlined, "Trump has not built a single mile of new border fence after 30 months in office."

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But while this is cause for celebration, The Atlantic staff writer Annie Lowrey offered a darker take on the implications of these numbers:

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