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Rep. Keith Ellison fine with leaving Congress if he becomes DNC chair

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One of the arguments building against Rep. Keith Ellison (D-MN) as the new Democratic National Committee chair is that as a sitting member of Congress he wouldn’t dedicate his full attention to the DNC. But Ellison is willing to resign if he becomes the new chair.

At a forum in Denver, Colorado Friday afternoon, Ellison explained that he’s heard the concerns from DNC members and he understands them.

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“I’ve talked with a lot of you and it’s become very apparent that many of you feel firmly about this,” Ellison said.

“Though I love being in Congress – it allows me to serve my neighbors – I think it’s more important to build and strengthen the DNC and the Democratic Party,” he continued. “And so the election is Feb. 24. There’s still many I have to talk to. I’m hoping you’ll keep your minds open as we continue to talk.”

Ellison did say that he is looking for a way to be able to do both jobs adequately, however.

“I’m in the process of deciding this issue and whether I can perform both roles. But will it be my top priority? Absolutely,” he said about the DNC gig.

One of the many complaints against former DNC chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz was that she not only had another full-time job, she could use the opportunity to help fellow members of Congress. Another conflict of interest arose when Schultz faced a primary opponent this year. The Democratic Party is to remain neutral in primaries, but it causes a problem when the chair of the party is challenged in a primary.

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Former DNC chair Howard Dean dropped out of the running for chair on Friday afternoon.

Ellison has been in the House since 2007 and is a co-chair of the Progressive Caucus. He’s already earned the endorsement from Sen. Bernie Sanders.

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Fox News reports wages rose faster under Obama than Trump after his campaign lashes out at predecessor

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In what was possibly a hint to remind people of his legacy this Monday, former President Barack Obama gave a shout out to the anniversary of his signing of the 2009 economic stimulus package.

“Eleven years ago today, near the bottom of the worst recession in generations, I signed the Recovery Act, paving the way for more than a decade of economic growth and the longest streak of job creation in American history,” Obama tweeted with a photo of his signature on the bill.

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Deputy national security adviser accused by White House officials of being ‘Anonymous’ may be reassigned

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According to a new report from Axios, there's a discussion amongst top Trump officials about reassigning deputy national security adviser Victoria Coates to the Department of Energy from the National Security Council. Coates has been the target of some inside the White House who accuse her of being behind an op-ed in the New York Times -- and later a bestselling book -- which chronicled a resistance movement inside the Trump administration.

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Ex-Obama adviser offers three essential tips for any Democrat who wants to beat Trump

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Dan Pfeiffer, a former adviser to President Barack Obama and current host of the "Pod Save America" podcast, has written a piece in Politico that offers three essential tips for whomever the Democratic Party nominates as its candidate for president.

In particular, Pfeiffer looks at the major mistakes that Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT) made when he ran against Obama in 2012, and which allowed Obama to win quite handily despite being stuck with an unemployment rate of 8 percent.

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