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California unveils sweeping plan to combat climate change

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California released a sweeping plan to cut the state’s output of heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions on Friday, countering the newly-minted Trump administration’s move to undo federal U.S. carbon regulations.

The plan drew battle lines for an expected clash with President Donald Trump over climate change, including a fight over the state’s decades-old authority to set emissions limits that are far stricter than those in many other parts of the United States.

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California’s plan details how the state would achieve its goal of cutting emissions 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030, which state air regulators called the most ambitious target in North America.

Trump has cast doubt on the degree to which human activity causes climate change. His nominee for secretary of the Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt, this week expressed doubts about the science behind climate change and said EPA rules should not hurt economic development.

The California plan includes an extension of the state’s controversial carbon cap and trade program and calls for the state’s oil refineries to cut their greenhouse gas emissions by 20 percent.

“Climate change is impacting California now, and we need to continue to take bold and effective action to address it head on to protect and improve the quality of life in California,” said CARB chair Mary Nichols.

The Trump administration on Friday removed all mentions of climate change from the White House website and said it would eliminate the Climate Action Plan, which seeks to cut emissions in part by preserving forests and encouraging increased use of cleaner renewable fuels. [L1N1FA1H6]

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During a congressional hearing on Wednesday, Pruitt said the government would not commit to letting California set more stringent vehicles emissions standards through a federal waiver.

Pruitt, the attorney general of Oklahoma, has sued the Obama administration over the Clean Power Plan, a key part of the nation’s effort to meet its international climate change agreement.

In addition to extending the cap and trade program out to 2030, California’s proposal calls for an 18 percent reduction in the carbon intensity of transportation fuels burned in the state and 4.2 million zero-emission vehicles on the road.

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It would set California’s economy, which is the world’s sixth largest, on a trajectory to achieving an 80 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, regulators said.

(Reporting by Rory Carroll, additional reporting by Valerie Volcovici; editing by G Crosse and Andrew Hay)

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2020 Election

How the question of who killed JFK emerged in an unexpected way on the 2020 campaign trail

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On Monday night in Fairfax, Virginia, Donald Jeffries, author and talk radio host, asked Democratic presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard about a book she was seen carrying, “JFK and the Unspeakable.” Published in 2008, the book is a Catholic philosopher’s meditation about the assassination of liberal president John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963, one of the great historical crimes of American politics.

Gabbard replied she had not finished the book, but “from what I have read, it… speaks to what happened [on November 22] in a way that I haven’t seen anywhere else.”

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Trump whines about losing the Time ‘Man of the Year’ award he lost to a teenage girl

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President Donald Trump goaded his audience into booing a teenager during a campaign rally in Colorado Springs on Thursday.

Trump said, "I got beaten up by Greta" -- in reference to Swedish climate change activist Greta Thunberg, who recently celebrated her 17th birthday.

The leader of the free world went on to complain about Thunberg being declared TIME magazine's "Person of the Year" award in 2019.

He said that many women wish it was still "Man of the Year" and suggested separate categories by gender, which would prevent him from competing against European teenage girls.

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Trump jokes that he’ll stay in office for 26 more years — and all his media critics are ‘going to miss us’

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At his latest campaign rally in Colorado Springs, Colorado, President Donald Trump launched into one of his typical attacks on media reports that print unflattering information about him, raging about "fake news" and calling it "so disgusting."

He then joked that he will be in office for 26 more years — which would be a flagrant violation of the Constitution's two-term limit for presidents — and that when he does, "they're going to miss us."

Watch below:

"When we leave office in 26 years or so, they're going to miss us" -- Trump jokes about shredding the Constitution and serving more than 2 terms pic.twitter.com/APckvRSXBz

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