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Civil rights activists arrested for protesting Trump’s Attorney General pick

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Police in Alabama arrested six civil rights activists staging a sit-in at Senator Jeff Sessions’ office on Tuesday to protest his nomination for U.S. Attorney General, criticizing his record on voting rights and race relations.

Sessions, 70, has a history of controversial positions on race, immigration and criminal justice reform.

Members of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) had vowed to occupy Sessions’ Mobile, Alabama office until the conservative Republican lawmaker either withdrew as a candidate or they were arrested.

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In the end, Cornell Brooks, president and CEO of the NAACP, and Stephen Green, national director of the youth division of the NAACP, were among those arrested, according to a post on the Twitter page of the civil rights organization.

The other four protesters arrested by police included Benard Simelton, president of the NAACP’s Alabama state conference, according to local news outlet AL.com.

A spokesman for Mobile police could not be reached for comment late on Tuesday.

The six protesters were charged with misdemeanor criminal trespassing, according to CNN.

Brooks before his arrest had posted a photo on Twitter of protesters in suits occupying the senator’s Mobile office.

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“Senator Sessions has callously ignored the reality of voter suppression but zealously prosecuted innocent civil rights leaders on trumped-up charges of voter fraud,” Brooks said in a news release.

A spokeswoman for Sessions called the NAACP’s criticisms “false portrayals.”

“Jeff Sessions has dedicated his career to upholding the rule of law, ensuring public safety and prosecuting government corruption,” spokeswoman Sarah Isgur Flores said in a statement. “Many African-American leaders who’ve known him for decades attest to this and have welcomed his nomination to be the next Attorney General.”

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President-elect Donald Trump in November named Sessions to lead the Justice Department and the FBI, and his history could come under scrutiny from fellow senators during a confirmation process.

Sessions was a U.S. prosecutor in 1986 when he became only the second nominee in 50 years to be denied confirmation as a federal judge. This came after allegations that he made racist remarks, including testimony that he called an African-American prosecutor “boy,” an allegation Sessions denied.

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Sessions denied he was a racist and said at his hearing that groups such as the NAACP and the American Civil Liberties Union could be considered “un-American.”

He also acknowledged calling the Voting Rights Act of 1965 “intrusive legislation.” (Reporting by Letitia Stein in Tampa, Florida and Alex Dobuzinskis in Los Angeles,; Editing by Andrew Hay and Simon Cameron-Moore)

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Americans still don’t know why Trump was rushed to Walter Reed hospital: ex-White House press secretary

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It's been three weeks since President Donald Trump was rushed to Walter Reed hospital, and former White House press secretary Joe Lockhart reminded his Twitter following that Americans still don't know what happened.

"It’s been 3weeks since the President made an unscheduled and rushed trip to Walter Reed. Americans have a right to know about the President's health and the WH explanations doesn’t pass the smell test. I hope there are still enterprising reporters on this. Democracy dies in the dark," Lockhart tweeted.

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Conservative explains how ‘boot-licker’ Lindsey Graham can be banned from impeachment vote

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Conservative Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin blasted Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) in her Sunday column, noting that no one ever really expected anything better from him.

Graham was asked during a panel discussion if it was every acceptable for an American president to ask for campaign help from a foreign government.

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‘To protect our democracy:’ Tuesday night rallies planned in all 50 states to demand Congress votes to impeach Trump

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At more than 500 rallies planned for Tuesday evening, hundreds of thousands of Americans are expected to call on the U.S. House to vote to impeach President Donald Trump.

The rallies will take place at congressional offices and other public spaces, the night before the House is expected to vote on two articles of impeachment accusing Trump of abusing his power when he pressured the Ukrainian president to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and obstructing Congress by stonewalling its investigation.

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