Quantcast
Connect with us

States push anti-science bills to ‘belittle evolution’ — but could allow teaching of eugenics, too

Published

on

A series of new legislative proposals in several states take aim at schools teaching evolution, the Hill reports.

Senators in South Dakota approved a Senate Bill 55 on Wednesday barring schools from prohibiting teachers from questioning established scientific theories. It could be assigned to a South Dakota House committee next week.

“No teacher may be prohibited from helping students understand, analyze, critique, or review in an objective scientific manner the strengths and weaknesses of scientific information presented in courses being taught which are aligned with the content standards established pursuant to,” the 36-word bill reads.

ADVERTISEMENT

South Dakota Sen. Jeff Monroe sponsored the bill following failed attempts in 2014 and 2015 to give teachers more leeway regarding controversial scientific lessons. In 2014, Monroe sponsored SB 112, which would have stopped school boards from prohibiting teachers from teaching creationism.

Though South Dakota’s SB 55 doesn’t specifically mention evolution, experts say the bill leaves the door open for teachers to teach whatever they want with regards to controversial topics.

“This is horrible, but let’s say I believe in eugenics,” Deb Wolf, a high school science instructional coach told the Argus Leader. “(SB 55) says that I couldn’t be prohibited, I couldn’t be stopped from teaching that as long as I did it in an objective scientific manner, and it doesn’t specify what that means.”

Similar bills are making their way through legislatures in Oklahoma and Indiana. According to the National Center for Science Education, Oklahoma’s SB 393 would require administrators to “assist teachers [in finding] effective ways to present the science curriculum as it addresses scientific controversies.” And Indiana’s Senate Resolution 17 would urge the state department of education “to reinforce support of teachers who choose to teach a diverse curriculum.”

“Where topics are taught that may generate controversy (such as biological evolution), that the curriculum should help students to understand the full range of scientific views that exist, why such topics can generate controversy, and how scientific discoveries can profoundly affect society,” Indiana’s Senate Resolution 17 reads.

ADVERTISEMENT

Glenn Branch, deputy director of the National Center for Science Education, told the Hill the language of these bills makes them “very hard to challenge on the basis that they’re unconstitutional, because they’re not requiring anyone to do anything.”

“They’re no longer trying to ban teaching evolution,” Branch said. “They’re no longer trying to balance teaching evolution. They’re now trying to belittle evolution.

ADVERTISEMENT

Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Watch Anderson Cooper use the long-form of ‘BS’ while shutting down Rod Blagojevich on CNN

Published

on

MSNBC anchor Anderson Cooper was visibly angered by claims made by former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich during a Friday evening CNN interview.

Blogojevich was sentenced to 14 years in federal prison for corruption while in office that included attempting to sell the U.S. Senate seat vacancy created when Barack Obama was elected president. His sentence was commuted by President Donald Trump.

Cooper lectured Blogojevich for getting sued while governor over a backlog of 3,000 clemency cases.

The CNN anchor described it as "a little ironic and frankly a little sad and pathetic and hypocritical."

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Judge rules against Devin Nunes in $9.9 million lawsuit over the salacious Steele Dossier

Published

on

Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA) suffered a legal setback after losing a major lawsuit he had filed.

"A federal judge has tossed out a racketeering lawsuit House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes filed last year against the private investigation firm at the heart of the Trump-Russia saga," Politico reported Friday evening.

"Alexandria, Virginia-based U.S. District Court Judge Liam O'Grady's two-page order made short work of Nunes' suit, which sought $9.9 million in damages from Fusion GPS, its founder Glenn Simpson and a nonprofit watchdog group, Campaign for Accountability," Politico explained. "The judge also signaled that pressing on with the legal battle could result in sanctions against Nunes and his attorney, Steven Biss."

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Devin Nunes is livid at report he helped Trump’s White House: ‘Who the hell is leaking this?’

Published

on

The ranking Republican on the House Intelligence Committee is suing Washington, DC's hometown newspaper.

Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA) announced that he was suing The Washington Post during a Friday appearance on Fox News.

“A senior U.S. intelligence official told lawmakers last week that Russia wants to see President Trump reelected, viewing his administration as more favorable to the Kremlin’s interests, according to people who were briefed on the comments,” The Washington Post reported Thursday. “Trump learned about Pierson’s remarks from Rep. Devin Nunes (Calif.), the committee’s ranking Republican and a staunch Trump ally, said one person familiar with the matter.”

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image