Quantcast
Connect with us

Trump immigration order restricted by judges in 3 more states

Published

on

Federal judges in three states followed one in New York in barring authorities from deporting travelers affected by U.S. President Donald Trump’s executive order imposing restrictions on immigration from seven Muslim-majority nations.

The judges in Massachusetts, Virginia and Washington state issued their rulings late on Saturday or early on Sunday.

Earlier on Saturday, U.S. District Judge Ann Donnelly in New York City’s Brooklyn borough ordered authorities to refrain from deporting previously approved refugees from those countries. She ruled on a lawsuit by two men from Iraq being held at Kennedy Airport.

ADVERTISEMENT

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security said in a statement on Sunday that it would comply with court rulings while at the same time implementing Trump’s order “to ensure that those entering the United States do not pose a threat to our country or the American people.”

Across the United States, lawyers worked overnight to help travelers caught up in confusion at airports after the new Republican president on Friday halted immigration from the seven countries and temporarily stopped the entry of refugees.

Attorneys and advocates said they have filed more than 100 cases for individual travelers around the country.

In Boston, U.S. District Judge Allison Burroughs on Sunday issued a temporary restraining order blocking the removal of two Iranians who taught at the University of Massachusetts who had been detained at Logan International Airport.

The order, set to last seven days, appeared to go further than Donnelly’s by barring officials from detaining, in addition to removing, approved refugees, visa holders and permanent U.S. residents from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Libya, Sudan, Somalia and Yemen. Donnelly’s order only forbade removing those affected by Trump’s order.

ADVERTISEMENT

The legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts, Matthew Segal, in a statement called Burroughs’ order “a huge victory for justice.”

“We told President Trump we would see him in court if he ordered this unconstitutional ban on Muslims,” Segal said. “He tried, and federal courts in Boston and throughout the nation stopped it in its tracks.”

In Alexandria, Virginia, U.S. District Judge Leonie Brinkema on Saturday night barred the Department of Homeland Security from removing 50 to 60 people detained at Dulles International Airport who are legal permanent residents. Dulles is one of the main airports serving Washington, D.C.

ADVERTISEMENT

Brinkema’s temporary restraining order also requires the agency to allow those individuals to speak with lawyers, according to the Legal Aid and Justice Center in Virginia, which provides representation to low-income individuals.

On the West Coast, U.S. District Judge Thomas Zilly in Seattle on Saturday barred the federal government from removing two unnamed individuals. He scheduled a further hearing on the issue for Feb. 3.

ADVERTISEMENT

Despite the legal challenges, supporters of Trump’s order said the government was within its rights to act swiftly to enforce the president’s order.

“It is better be safe than sorry,” said Jessica Vaughan, director of policy studies at the conservative group the Center for Immigration Studies in Washington.

(Reporting by Nate Raymond in New York; Editing by Jonathan Oatis)

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Newly released emails show White House prepared to freeze Ukraine aid hours before Trump’s phone call

Published

on

White House budget officials were preparing to freeze aid to Ukraine the night before President Donald Trump's infamous July 25 phone call to the country's new president, according to newly released emails.

The Office of Management and Budget handed over nearly 200 pages of records related to the president's actions toward Ukraine to the transparency group American Oversight, and one of the heavily redacted emails from July 24 shows OMB officials shared a “Ukraine Prep Memo” with Michael Duffey, reported CNN.

Continue Reading

Ana Kasparian's #NoFilter

Trump impeachment trial: 4 stories from first day spell doom for Mitch McConnell

Published

on

If the score was kept for the first day of the impeachment trial, it would show hefty losses for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

As Former Special Counsel for the Department of Defense, Ryan Goodman, pointed out, four major headlines perfectly reflect the cracks in the strangle-hold McConnell has had on his party.

First, McConnell was forced to change the impeachment hearing rules. After a huge uprising by Americans demanding to be able to watch the impeachment trial during normal human hours, senators told McConnell he'd lost the votes to hold proceedings after midnight.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

‘Disease fanboy’: Internet slams NBC conservative for ‘rooting for pandemic’ to distract from Trump impeachment trial

Published

on

Hugh Hewitt is once again under fire, this time for almost appearing to be glad a deadly SARS-related virus has been diagnosed in a patient in Washington state – saying additional diagnoses will take the focus away from the Senate's historic impeachment trial. Hewitt is a conservative Washington Post columnist, radio host, MSNBC and NBC contributor, and law professor who went from being a "Never-Trumper" to all-in for President Donald Trump.

"People care much more for their health than theater," said Hewitt via Twitter, referring to Trump's impeachment trial. The SARS-related virus, known as the Wuhan coronavirus, is named for an area of China where it was first found. It "has infected more than 300 people and killed six in an outbreak that has struck China, Thailand, South Korea, Japan and now the US," CNN reports.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image