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Virginia GOPer proposes law that would force teachers to ‘out’ closeted students to their parents

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A Republican member of the Virginia House of Delegates has proposed a bill that — if ratified — would force teachers to “out” closeted LGBTQ students to their parents.

According to the Washington Blade, GOP Del. Bob Marshall has proposed a law that is very similar to North Carolina’s disastrous H.B. 2, which forbade trans North Carolinians from using the restroom of their expressed gender.

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But, included in Marshall’s bill is an “outlier” parental notification clause, said Cathryn Oakley of the Human Rights Campaign to the Blade. Under Virginia’s H.B. 1612, educators and other child welfare personnel would be compelled by law to tell parents that their child could be lesbian, gay, transgender, bisexual or questioning.

H.B. 1612 also includes an enforcement clause for its anti-trans restroom segregation measure, which North Carolina’s bill did not.

The Blade explained that the law — ironically named “The Physical Privacy Act” — “contains a provision that would compel a government-owned facility to pay civil damages to anyone who is found to have suffered physical or emotional distress because a person uses a sex-segregated facility based on their gender identity.”

The law could do real harm if enacted. Often LGBTQ youth are subject to intolerant home environments where their identities are not accepted. To have their parents made aware of their orientations without their consent could result in the child being abused, forced out of the home or forced to undergo ineffective and psychologically damaging “conversion therapy.”

Republicans around the country are attempting to launch similar bills in state legislatures in spite of the spectacular failure of North Carolina’s so-called “bathroom bill.”

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Under the Republican legislature and now-ousted Tea Party Gov. Pat McCrory, the state passed the discriminatory law and then lost billions of dollars in state revenue as athletic associations and touring performers detoured around the state.

“We are anticipating seeing bills like these crop up in states across the country,” said Oakley. “They are ill-advised and discriminatory in every single state.”


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World virus cases top 6 million as leaders disagree on pandemic response

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The number of coronavirus cases worldwide topped six million Sunday, with Brazil registering another record surge in daily infections as divisions deepened on how to deal with the pandemic.

Latin American countries are bracing for difficult weeks ahead as the disease spreads rapidly across the region, even as much of the world exits lockdowns that have wrecked economies and stripped millions of their jobs.

In Brazil -- the epicenter of South America's outbreak with nearly 500,000 confirmed cases, lagging only behind the United States -- disagreement among leaders over lockdown measures has hampered efforts to slow the virus as the number of fatalities in the country nears 30,000.

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Curfews and clashes as police brutality protests escalate

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Curfews were imposed on major US cities as clashes over police brutality erupted across America with demonstrators ignoring warnings from President Donald Trump that his government would stop the violent protests "cold."

Minneapolis, the epicenter of the unrest, was gripped by a fifth consecutive night of violence on Saturday with police in riot gear firing tear gas and stun grenades at protesters venting fury at the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man, during an arrest in the city on Monday.

Los Angeles, Chicago and Atlanta were among two dozen cities ordering people to stay indoors overnight as more states called in National Guard soldiers to help control the civil unrest not seen in the United States for years.

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2020 Election

‘Insanity outside the White House’: After Trump stokes tensions, fresh clashes between police and protesters

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As protests against police violence and the killing of George Floyd continued in cities across the U.S. on Saturday, a massive crowd gathered outside President Donald Trump's White House as demonstrators again turned their ire and demands for justice and healing towards the nation's most powerful elected official. After tensions built, clashes erupted between law enforcement and demonstrators.

Tensions flared near the White House. Not sure what triggered it, all I saw was a blast of pepper spray and a sudden sprint backward. There’s a lot more pressure on the police cordon and they’re pulling out gas masks. pic.twitter.com/X4uCQRzPkw

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